Role of PD-L1 and PD-L2 in allergic diseases and asthma

A. K. Singh, P. Stock, O. Akbari

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

65 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Asthma is the result of chronic airway inflammation associated predominantly with CD4+ cells, eosinophils, mast cells, and basophils. Several T-cells subsets, including NKT cells, play a critical role in orchestrating the inflammation in the airways predominantly, by secreting interleukin-4 and interleukin-13. Recently, programmed death-1 (PD-1) with its ligands, programmed death ligand B7H1 (PD-L1) and B7DC (PD-L2), was shown to regulate T-cell activation and tolerance. PD-1 has been characterized as a negative regulator of conventional CD4+T cells. In addition, the relative roles of PD-L1 and PD-L2 in regulating the activation and function of T cells have recently been characterized. Recent studies have demonstrated that PD-L1 and PD-L2 have important but opposing roles in modulating and polarizing T-cell functions in airway hyperreactivity. Whereas the severity of asthma is greatly enhanced in absence of PD-L2, PD-L1 deficiency resulted in reduced airway hyperresponsiveness and only minimal inflammation. This observation is partially because of the polarization of NKT cells in PD-L1- and PD-L2-deficient mice. This review will discuss the recent literature regarding the role of PD-L1 and PD-L2 in allergic disease and asthma. Current understanding of the role of PD ligands in allergic asthma gives impetus to the development of novel therapeutic approaches.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)155-162
Number of pages8
JournalAllergy: European Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology
Volume66
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2011
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Programmed Cell Death 1 Ligand 2 Protein
Asthma
Ligands
T-Lymphocytes
Natural Killer T-Cells
Inflammation
Interleukin-13
Basophils
T-Lymphocyte Subsets
Eosinophils
Mast Cells
Interleukin-4

Keywords

  • asthma
  • programmed death ligand 1
  • programmed death ligand 2
  • programmed death-1

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • Immunology and Allergy

Cite this

Role of PD-L1 and PD-L2 in allergic diseases and asthma. / Singh, A. K.; Stock, P.; Akbari, O.

In: Allergy: European Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Vol. 66, No. 2, 02.2011, p. 155-162.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Singh, A. K. ; Stock, P. ; Akbari, O. / Role of PD-L1 and PD-L2 in allergic diseases and asthma. In: Allergy: European Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology. 2011 ; Vol. 66, No. 2. pp. 155-162.
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