Role of subcutaneous adipose tissue in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance

Pavankumar Patel, Nicola Abate

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

42 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Burden of obesity has increased significantly in the United States over last few decades. Association of obesity with insulin resistance and related cardiometabolic problems is well established. Traditionally, adipose tissue in visceral fat depot has been considered a major culprit in development of insulin resistance. However, growing body of the literature has suggested that adipose tissue in subcutaneous fat depot, not only due to larger volume but also due to inherent functional characteristics, can have significant impact on development of insulin resistance. There are significant differences in functional characteristics of subcutaneous abdominal/truncal versus gluteofemoral depots. Decreased capacity for adipocyte differentiation and angiogenesis along with adipocyte hypertrophy can trigger vicious cycle of inflammation in subcutaneous adipose tissue and subsequent ectopic fat deposition. It is important to shift focus from fat content to functional heterogeneity in adipose tissue depots to better understand the relative role of subcutaneous adipose tissue in metabolic complications of obesity. Therapeutic lifestyle change continues to be the most important intervention in clinical practice at any level of increased adiposity. Future pharmaceutical interventions aimed at improving adipose tissue function in various subcutaneous depots have potential to help maintain adequate insulin sensitivity and reduce risk for development of insulin resistance complications.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number489187
JournalJournal of Obesity
Volume2013
DOIs
StatePublished - 2013

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Subcutaneous Fat
Insulin Resistance
Adipose Tissue
Obesity
Adipocytes
Fats
Intra-Abdominal Fat
Adiposity
Hypertrophy
Life Style
Inflammation
Pharmaceutical Preparations

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Role of subcutaneous adipose tissue in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance. / Patel, Pavankumar; Abate, Nicola.

In: Journal of Obesity, Vol. 2013, 489187, 2013.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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