Rural-urban differences in estimated life expectancy associated with neighborhood-level cumulative social and environmental determinants

John D. Prochaska, Daniel Jupiter, Scott Horel, Jennifer Vardeman, James N. Burdine

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Diverse neighborhood-level environmental and social impacts on health are well documented. While studies typically examine these impacts individually, examining potential health impacts from multiple sources as a whole can provide a broader context of overall neighborhood-level health impacts compared to examining each component independently. This study examined the association between cumulative neighborhood-level potential health impacts on health and expected life expectancy within neighborhoods (census tracts) across Texas using the Neighborhood Potential Health Impact Score tool. Among urban census tract neighborhoods, a difference of nearly 5 years was estimated between neighborhoods with the least health promoting cumulative health impacts compared to neighborhoods with the most health promoting cumulative health impacts. Differences were observed between rural and urban census tract neighborhoods, with rural areas having less variability in expected life expectancy associated with neighborhood-level cumulative potential health impacts compared to urban areas.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number106214
JournalPreventive Medicine
Volume139
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2020

Keywords

  • Built environment
  • Cumulative risk
  • Environmental health
  • Health impact assessment
  • Life expectancy
  • Neighborhoods

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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