Scientific publication misrepresentation among orthopaedic residency applicants

Marc El Beaino, John Hagedorn, Cory F. Janney, Ronald Lindsey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: The predictors of erroneous publication reporting among orthopaedic surgery residency applicants have not been established. Methods: A retrospective analysis of the reported scholarly activity of candidates who applied to our orthopaedic surgery department for a first-year residency position in 2017 was conducted to determine the incidence of scientific publication misrepresentation and analyze its association with pre-residency criteria. Results: Out of 510 candidates, 264 (51.8%) applicants included accepted, in-press, or published scholarly activity on their resumes. The incidence of misrepresentation was 20.5%, and did not differ statistically based on the candidates’ academic performance (United States Medical Licensing Examination – USMLE – steps 1 and 2 scores), Alpha Omega Alpha (AOA) membership, immigration status, or or additional academic degrees (p > 0.05). Conclusions: Misrepresentation is a persistent problem among residency training program applicants, and did not correlate with an applicant's academic performance, AOA membership, immigration status, or additional advanced academic degrees.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAmerican Journal of Surgery
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2018

Fingerprint

Internship and Residency
Orthopedics
Publications
Emigration and Immigration
Incidence
Licensure
Education

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Scientific publication misrepresentation among orthopaedic residency applicants. / El Beaino, Marc; Hagedorn, John; Janney, Cory F.; Lindsey, Ronald.

In: American Journal of Surgery, 01.01.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{12327929b9ed4df2a9038acf1b6e4294,
title = "Scientific publication misrepresentation among orthopaedic residency applicants",
abstract = "Background: The predictors of erroneous publication reporting among orthopaedic surgery residency applicants have not been established. Methods: A retrospective analysis of the reported scholarly activity of candidates who applied to our orthopaedic surgery department for a first-year residency position in 2017 was conducted to determine the incidence of scientific publication misrepresentation and analyze its association with pre-residency criteria. Results: Out of 510 candidates, 264 (51.8{\%}) applicants included accepted, in-press, or published scholarly activity on their resumes. The incidence of misrepresentation was 20.5{\%}, and did not differ statistically based on the candidates’ academic performance (United States Medical Licensing Examination – USMLE – steps 1 and 2 scores), Alpha Omega Alpha (AOA) membership, immigration status, or or additional academic degrees (p > 0.05). Conclusions: Misrepresentation is a persistent problem among residency training program applicants, and did not correlate with an applicant's academic performance, AOA membership, immigration status, or additional advanced academic degrees.",
author = "{El Beaino}, Marc and John Hagedorn and Janney, {Cory F.} and Ronald Lindsey",
year = "2018",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.amjsurg.2018.11.036",
language = "English (US)",
journal = "American Journal of Surgery",
issn = "0002-9610",
publisher = "Elsevier Inc.",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Scientific publication misrepresentation among orthopaedic residency applicants

AU - El Beaino, Marc

AU - Hagedorn, John

AU - Janney, Cory F.

AU - Lindsey, Ronald

PY - 2018/1/1

Y1 - 2018/1/1

N2 - Background: The predictors of erroneous publication reporting among orthopaedic surgery residency applicants have not been established. Methods: A retrospective analysis of the reported scholarly activity of candidates who applied to our orthopaedic surgery department for a first-year residency position in 2017 was conducted to determine the incidence of scientific publication misrepresentation and analyze its association with pre-residency criteria. Results: Out of 510 candidates, 264 (51.8%) applicants included accepted, in-press, or published scholarly activity on their resumes. The incidence of misrepresentation was 20.5%, and did not differ statistically based on the candidates’ academic performance (United States Medical Licensing Examination – USMLE – steps 1 and 2 scores), Alpha Omega Alpha (AOA) membership, immigration status, or or additional academic degrees (p > 0.05). Conclusions: Misrepresentation is a persistent problem among residency training program applicants, and did not correlate with an applicant's academic performance, AOA membership, immigration status, or additional advanced academic degrees.

AB - Background: The predictors of erroneous publication reporting among orthopaedic surgery residency applicants have not been established. Methods: A retrospective analysis of the reported scholarly activity of candidates who applied to our orthopaedic surgery department for a first-year residency position in 2017 was conducted to determine the incidence of scientific publication misrepresentation and analyze its association with pre-residency criteria. Results: Out of 510 candidates, 264 (51.8%) applicants included accepted, in-press, or published scholarly activity on their resumes. The incidence of misrepresentation was 20.5%, and did not differ statistically based on the candidates’ academic performance (United States Medical Licensing Examination – USMLE – steps 1 and 2 scores), Alpha Omega Alpha (AOA) membership, immigration status, or or additional academic degrees (p > 0.05). Conclusions: Misrepresentation is a persistent problem among residency training program applicants, and did not correlate with an applicant's academic performance, AOA membership, immigration status, or additional advanced academic degrees.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85057506922&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85057506922&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.amjsurg.2018.11.036

DO - 10.1016/j.amjsurg.2018.11.036

M3 - Article

JO - American Journal of Surgery

JF - American Journal of Surgery

SN - 0002-9610

ER -