Secondhand smoke exposure among nonsmoking adolescents in West Africa

Hadii M. Mamudu, Sreenivas P. Veeranki, Rijo M. John, David M. Kioko, Ahmed E. Ogwell Ouma

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives. Weestimated the prevalence and determinants of secondhand smoke (SHS) exposure among nonsmoking adolescents in 9 West African countries. Methods. We conducted a pooled analysis with nationally representative 2006 to 2009 Global Youth Tobacco Survey data. We used descriptive statistics to determine the prevalence of SHS exposure and inferential statistics using a multivariable logistic regression model to determine factors associated with SHS exposure. We investigated average marginal effect results that show the probability of SHS exposure, adjusting for all other attributes. Results. SHS exposure inside the home ranged from 13.0% to 45.0%; SHS exposure outside the home ranged from24.7%to 80.1%. Parental or peer smoking behaviorswere significantly associatedwith higher probability of SHS exposure in all 9 countries. Knowledge of smoking harm, support for smoking bans, exposure to antismoking media messages, and receptivity of school tobacco education were significantly associated with higher SHS exposure in most countries. Conclusions. West African policymakers should adopt policies consistent with Article 8 of the World Health Organization Framework Convention on Tobacco Control and its guidelines and public health education to promote smoke-free households.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1823-1830
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican Journal of Public Health
Volume105
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2015

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Tobacco Smoke Pollution
Western Africa
Tobacco
Smoking
Logistic Models
Health Education
Smoke
Public Health
Guidelines
Education

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Mamudu, H. M., Veeranki, S. P., John, R. M., Kioko, D. M., & Ogwell Ouma, A. E. (2015). Secondhand smoke exposure among nonsmoking adolescents in West Africa. American Journal of Public Health, 105(9), 1823-1830. https://doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2015.302661

Secondhand smoke exposure among nonsmoking adolescents in West Africa. / Mamudu, Hadii M.; Veeranki, Sreenivas P.; John, Rijo M.; Kioko, David M.; Ogwell Ouma, Ahmed E.

In: American Journal of Public Health, Vol. 105, No. 9, 01.09.2015, p. 1823-1830.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mamudu, HM, Veeranki, SP, John, RM, Kioko, DM & Ogwell Ouma, AE 2015, 'Secondhand smoke exposure among nonsmoking adolescents in West Africa', American Journal of Public Health, vol. 105, no. 9, pp. 1823-1830. https://doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2015.302661
Mamudu, Hadii M. ; Veeranki, Sreenivas P. ; John, Rijo M. ; Kioko, David M. ; Ogwell Ouma, Ahmed E. / Secondhand smoke exposure among nonsmoking adolescents in West Africa. In: American Journal of Public Health. 2015 ; Vol. 105, No. 9. pp. 1823-1830.
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