Secretion of immunoglobulin A by human milk leukocytes initiated by surface membrane stimuli

E. A. Weaver, H. E. Rudloff, R. M. Goldblum, C. P. Davis, A. S. Goldman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Some of the requirements for release of immunoglobulin A (IgA) from human milk leukocytes during phagocytosis were investigated. The role of particle adherence in IgA release was studied by using an in vitro model of frustrated phagocytosis in which human milk leukocytes were incubated with latex particles too large to ingest. Release of IgA was significantly increased from control values within 30 min in these leukocytes. A similar increment in IgA release also occurred when human milk leukocytes were incubated with other surface membrane stimuli, e.g., NFMP and phorbol. No increase in IgA release was found, however, in cells incubated with zymozan-activated serum. In addition, the release of IgA was blocked by inhibitors of actin filaments (cytochalasin B) and microtubules (colchicine). Thus, IgA is released from human milk leukocytes by secretory mechanisms that are initiated by certain membrane stimuli, some of which are shared by peripheral blood neutrophils and monocytes. Because human milk leukocytes appear to be refractory to C5a or other activated complement components and are blocked by cytochalasin B, it appears that these unusual cells may be uniquely adapted to play a role in the immunologic protection of the neonate.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)684-689
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Immunology
Volume132
Issue number2
StatePublished - 1984

Fingerprint

Human Milk
Immunoglobulin A
Leukocytes
Membranes
Cytochalasin B
Phagocytosis
Colchicine
Actin Cytoskeleton
Microspheres
Microtubules
Monocytes
Neutrophils
Serum

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology

Cite this

Weaver, E. A., Rudloff, H. E., Goldblum, R. M., Davis, C. P., & Goldman, A. S. (1984). Secretion of immunoglobulin A by human milk leukocytes initiated by surface membrane stimuli. Journal of Immunology, 132(2), 684-689.

Secretion of immunoglobulin A by human milk leukocytes initiated by surface membrane stimuli. / Weaver, E. A.; Rudloff, H. E.; Goldblum, R. M.; Davis, C. P.; Goldman, A. S.

In: Journal of Immunology, Vol. 132, No. 2, 1984, p. 684-689.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Weaver, EA, Rudloff, HE, Goldblum, RM, Davis, CP & Goldman, AS 1984, 'Secretion of immunoglobulin A by human milk leukocytes initiated by surface membrane stimuli', Journal of Immunology, vol. 132, no. 2, pp. 684-689.
Weaver EA, Rudloff HE, Goldblum RM, Davis CP, Goldman AS. Secretion of immunoglobulin A by human milk leukocytes initiated by surface membrane stimuli. Journal of Immunology. 1984;132(2):684-689.
Weaver, E. A. ; Rudloff, H. E. ; Goldblum, R. M. ; Davis, C. P. ; Goldman, A. S. / Secretion of immunoglobulin A by human milk leukocytes initiated by surface membrane stimuli. In: Journal of Immunology. 1984 ; Vol. 132, No. 2. pp. 684-689.
@article{f58ffaa1dcb842449f5625e6f77569ea,
title = "Secretion of immunoglobulin A by human milk leukocytes initiated by surface membrane stimuli",
abstract = "Some of the requirements for release of immunoglobulin A (IgA) from human milk leukocytes during phagocytosis were investigated. The role of particle adherence in IgA release was studied by using an in vitro model of frustrated phagocytosis in which human milk leukocytes were incubated with latex particles too large to ingest. Release of IgA was significantly increased from control values within 30 min in these leukocytes. A similar increment in IgA release also occurred when human milk leukocytes were incubated with other surface membrane stimuli, e.g., NFMP and phorbol. No increase in IgA release was found, however, in cells incubated with zymozan-activated serum. In addition, the release of IgA was blocked by inhibitors of actin filaments (cytochalasin B) and microtubules (colchicine). Thus, IgA is released from human milk leukocytes by secretory mechanisms that are initiated by certain membrane stimuli, some of which are shared by peripheral blood neutrophils and monocytes. Because human milk leukocytes appear to be refractory to C5a or other activated complement components and are blocked by cytochalasin B, it appears that these unusual cells may be uniquely adapted to play a role in the immunologic protection of the neonate.",
author = "Weaver, {E. A.} and Rudloff, {H. E.} and Goldblum, {R. M.} and Davis, {C. P.} and Goldman, {A. S.}",
year = "1984",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "132",
pages = "684--689",
journal = "Journal of Immunology",
issn = "0022-1767",
publisher = "American Association of Immunologists",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Secretion of immunoglobulin A by human milk leukocytes initiated by surface membrane stimuli

AU - Weaver, E. A.

AU - Rudloff, H. E.

AU - Goldblum, R. M.

AU - Davis, C. P.

AU - Goldman, A. S.

PY - 1984

Y1 - 1984

N2 - Some of the requirements for release of immunoglobulin A (IgA) from human milk leukocytes during phagocytosis were investigated. The role of particle adherence in IgA release was studied by using an in vitro model of frustrated phagocytosis in which human milk leukocytes were incubated with latex particles too large to ingest. Release of IgA was significantly increased from control values within 30 min in these leukocytes. A similar increment in IgA release also occurred when human milk leukocytes were incubated with other surface membrane stimuli, e.g., NFMP and phorbol. No increase in IgA release was found, however, in cells incubated with zymozan-activated serum. In addition, the release of IgA was blocked by inhibitors of actin filaments (cytochalasin B) and microtubules (colchicine). Thus, IgA is released from human milk leukocytes by secretory mechanisms that are initiated by certain membrane stimuli, some of which are shared by peripheral blood neutrophils and monocytes. Because human milk leukocytes appear to be refractory to C5a or other activated complement components and are blocked by cytochalasin B, it appears that these unusual cells may be uniquely adapted to play a role in the immunologic protection of the neonate.

AB - Some of the requirements for release of immunoglobulin A (IgA) from human milk leukocytes during phagocytosis were investigated. The role of particle adherence in IgA release was studied by using an in vitro model of frustrated phagocytosis in which human milk leukocytes were incubated with latex particles too large to ingest. Release of IgA was significantly increased from control values within 30 min in these leukocytes. A similar increment in IgA release also occurred when human milk leukocytes were incubated with other surface membrane stimuli, e.g., NFMP and phorbol. No increase in IgA release was found, however, in cells incubated with zymozan-activated serum. In addition, the release of IgA was blocked by inhibitors of actin filaments (cytochalasin B) and microtubules (colchicine). Thus, IgA is released from human milk leukocytes by secretory mechanisms that are initiated by certain membrane stimuli, some of which are shared by peripheral blood neutrophils and monocytes. Because human milk leukocytes appear to be refractory to C5a or other activated complement components and are blocked by cytochalasin B, it appears that these unusual cells may be uniquely adapted to play a role in the immunologic protection of the neonate.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0021357977&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0021357977&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 6690613

AN - SCOPUS:0021357977

VL - 132

SP - 684

EP - 689

JO - Journal of Immunology

JF - Journal of Immunology

SN - 0022-1767

IS - 2

ER -