Segmental Living Related Small Bowel Transplantation in Adults

Luca Cicalese, Cristiana Rastellini, Pierpaolo Sileri, Herand Abcarian, Enrico Benedetti

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

33 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The advent of small bowel transplantation has provided selected patients with chronic intestinal irreversible failure with a physiologic alternative to total parenteral nutrition. Recently a standardized technique for living related small bowel transplantation (LR-SBTx) has been developed. Three patients with short bowel syndrome underwent LR-SBTx at our institution. All donors were ABO compatible with a good human leukocyte antigen match. A segment of 180 to 200 cm of ileum was harvested and transplanted with its vascular pedicle constituted by the ileocolic artery and vein. The grafts were transplanted with a short cold and warm ischemia time. The immunosuppression regimen consisted of oral FK-506, prednisone, and intravenous induction with atgam. Serial biopsies of the intestinal grafts were performed to evaluate rejection or viral infections. The postoperative course was uneventful for all donors. All of the recipients are currently alive and well. Two of three patients are off total parenteral nutrition and tolerating an oral diet with no limitations on daily activity. In the third patient, the graft was removed 6 weeks after transplantation. At the time of enterectomy, no technical or immunologic complications were documented. Absorption tests for D-xylose and fecal fat studies were performed showing functional adaptation of the segmental graft. All biopsies were negative for acute rejection. A well-matched segmental ileal graft from a living donor can provide complete rehabilitation for patients with short bowel syndrome. Our initial experience suggests that the risk of acute rejection and infection is greatly reduced compared to cadaveric bowel transplantation. Further clinical application of this procedure is warranted.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)168-173
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Gastrointestinal Surgery
Volume5
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2001
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Transplantation
Transplants
Short Bowel Syndrome
Total Parenteral Nutrition
Tissue Donors
Biopsy
Cold Ischemia
Warm Ischemia
Living Donors
Xylose
Tacrolimus
Virus Diseases
HLA Antigens
Prednisone
Ileum
Immunosuppression
Blood Vessels
Veins
Rehabilitation
Arteries

Keywords

  • Human
  • Intestinal transplantation
  • Living related donor
  • Outcome

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Segmental Living Related Small Bowel Transplantation in Adults. / Cicalese, Luca; Rastellini, Cristiana; Sileri, Pierpaolo; Abcarian, Herand; Benedetti, Enrico.

In: Journal of Gastrointestinal Surgery, Vol. 5, No. 2, 03.2001, p. 168-173.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Cicalese, Luca ; Rastellini, Cristiana ; Sileri, Pierpaolo ; Abcarian, Herand ; Benedetti, Enrico. / Segmental Living Related Small Bowel Transplantation in Adults. In: Journal of Gastrointestinal Surgery. 2001 ; Vol. 5, No. 2. pp. 168-173.
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