Sepsis does not alter plasma volume expansion (PVE) in response to 0.9% saline infusion in sheep

K. I. Brauer, Donald Prough, J. B. Clifton, L. D. Traber, D. L. Traber

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Introduction: No data compare the dynamics of PVE after crystalloid infusion before and after sepsis. Stahle et al1 have developed pharmacokinetic models to describe PVE in response to fluid infusion. We hypothesized that the septic state decreases PVE after 0.9 % saline infusion. Methods: Adult (n=6) female merino sheep (42±5 kg) were splenectomized and chronically instrumented with cardiovascular catheters. After a 5-day recovery period, animals were subjected to a 3-day test period. On day 1 (baseline) we infused 25 mL/kg of 0.9% saline for 20 min. On day 2 we initiated a continuous Pseudomonas aeruginosa infusion. Four hrs thereafter (early sepsis), and 24 hrs thereafter (late sepsis) we infused 25 mL/kg of 0.9% saline for 20 min. PVE was analyzed kinetically from decreases in Hemoglobin and initial plasma volumes measured using Evan's blue dye. Data were compared via repeated measures analysis of variance, with P<0.05 considered significant. Results: One sheep died during late sepsis. Plasma oncotic pressure decreased from 20.9±1.9 (baseline) to 17.3±0.7 (early) and to 13.9±1.6 mmHg (late sepsis). Systemic vascular resistance decreased from 1729±181 (baseline) to 1371±181 (early) and 1098±236 dyne sec cm-6 (late sepsis). Cardiac index increased from 5.1±0.7 (baseline) to 5.9±0.8 (early) and 7.8±1.6 L/min/m2 (late sepsis). PVE was 312± 87 mL, 386±64 mL and 400±88 mL for baseline, early and late sepsis, respectively, at the end of infusion and then decreased over 30 to 40 min to 97±30 mL, 151±72 mL and 103±82 mL, respectively. Urinary output and calculated extravascular fluid accumulation were not different among groups. Conclusion: Changed hemodynamics in the septic state do not change PVE in response to a crystalloid volume challenge.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalCritical Care Medicine
Volume27
Issue number1 SUPPL.
StatePublished - 1999

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Plasma Volume
Sheep
Sepsis
Evans Blue
Vascular Resistance
Pseudomonas aeruginosa
Analysis of Variance
Hemoglobins
Coloring Agents
Catheters
Pharmacokinetics
Hemodynamics
Pressure

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine

Cite this

Brauer, K. I., Prough, D., Clifton, J. B., Traber, L. D., & Traber, D. L. (1999). Sepsis does not alter plasma volume expansion (PVE) in response to 0.9% saline infusion in sheep. Critical Care Medicine, 27(1 SUPPL.).

Sepsis does not alter plasma volume expansion (PVE) in response to 0.9% saline infusion in sheep. / Brauer, K. I.; Prough, Donald; Clifton, J. B.; Traber, L. D.; Traber, D. L.

In: Critical Care Medicine, Vol. 27, No. 1 SUPPL., 1999.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Brauer, K. I. ; Prough, Donald ; Clifton, J. B. ; Traber, L. D. ; Traber, D. L. / Sepsis does not alter plasma volume expansion (PVE) in response to 0.9% saline infusion in sheep. In: Critical Care Medicine. 1999 ; Vol. 27, No. 1 SUPPL.
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abstract = "Introduction: No data compare the dynamics of PVE after crystalloid infusion before and after sepsis. Stahle et al1 have developed pharmacokinetic models to describe PVE in response to fluid infusion. We hypothesized that the septic state decreases PVE after 0.9 {\%} saline infusion. Methods: Adult (n=6) female merino sheep (42±5 kg) were splenectomized and chronically instrumented with cardiovascular catheters. After a 5-day recovery period, animals were subjected to a 3-day test period. On day 1 (baseline) we infused 25 mL/kg of 0.9{\%} saline for 20 min. On day 2 we initiated a continuous Pseudomonas aeruginosa infusion. Four hrs thereafter (early sepsis), and 24 hrs thereafter (late sepsis) we infused 25 mL/kg of 0.9{\%} saline for 20 min. PVE was analyzed kinetically from decreases in Hemoglobin and initial plasma volumes measured using Evan's blue dye. Data were compared via repeated measures analysis of variance, with P<0.05 considered significant. Results: One sheep died during late sepsis. Plasma oncotic pressure decreased from 20.9±1.9 (baseline) to 17.3±0.7 (early) and to 13.9±1.6 mmHg (late sepsis). Systemic vascular resistance decreased from 1729±181 (baseline) to 1371±181 (early) and 1098±236 dyne sec cm-6 (late sepsis). Cardiac index increased from 5.1±0.7 (baseline) to 5.9±0.8 (early) and 7.8±1.6 L/min/m2 (late sepsis). PVE was 312± 87 mL, 386±64 mL and 400±88 mL for baseline, early and late sepsis, respectively, at the end of infusion and then decreased over 30 to 40 min to 97±30 mL, 151±72 mL and 103±82 mL, respectively. Urinary output and calculated extravascular fluid accumulation were not different among groups. Conclusion: Changed hemodynamics in the septic state do not change PVE in response to a crystalloid volume challenge.",
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AU - Brauer, K. I.

AU - Prough, Donald

AU - Clifton, J. B.

AU - Traber, L. D.

AU - Traber, D. L.

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N2 - Introduction: No data compare the dynamics of PVE after crystalloid infusion before and after sepsis. Stahle et al1 have developed pharmacokinetic models to describe PVE in response to fluid infusion. We hypothesized that the septic state decreases PVE after 0.9 % saline infusion. Methods: Adult (n=6) female merino sheep (42±5 kg) were splenectomized and chronically instrumented with cardiovascular catheters. After a 5-day recovery period, animals were subjected to a 3-day test period. On day 1 (baseline) we infused 25 mL/kg of 0.9% saline for 20 min. On day 2 we initiated a continuous Pseudomonas aeruginosa infusion. Four hrs thereafter (early sepsis), and 24 hrs thereafter (late sepsis) we infused 25 mL/kg of 0.9% saline for 20 min. PVE was analyzed kinetically from decreases in Hemoglobin and initial plasma volumes measured using Evan's blue dye. Data were compared via repeated measures analysis of variance, with P<0.05 considered significant. Results: One sheep died during late sepsis. Plasma oncotic pressure decreased from 20.9±1.9 (baseline) to 17.3±0.7 (early) and to 13.9±1.6 mmHg (late sepsis). Systemic vascular resistance decreased from 1729±181 (baseline) to 1371±181 (early) and 1098±236 dyne sec cm-6 (late sepsis). Cardiac index increased from 5.1±0.7 (baseline) to 5.9±0.8 (early) and 7.8±1.6 L/min/m2 (late sepsis). PVE was 312± 87 mL, 386±64 mL and 400±88 mL for baseline, early and late sepsis, respectively, at the end of infusion and then decreased over 30 to 40 min to 97±30 mL, 151±72 mL and 103±82 mL, respectively. Urinary output and calculated extravascular fluid accumulation were not different among groups. Conclusion: Changed hemodynamics in the septic state do not change PVE in response to a crystalloid volume challenge.

AB - Introduction: No data compare the dynamics of PVE after crystalloid infusion before and after sepsis. Stahle et al1 have developed pharmacokinetic models to describe PVE in response to fluid infusion. We hypothesized that the septic state decreases PVE after 0.9 % saline infusion. Methods: Adult (n=6) female merino sheep (42±5 kg) were splenectomized and chronically instrumented with cardiovascular catheters. After a 5-day recovery period, animals were subjected to a 3-day test period. On day 1 (baseline) we infused 25 mL/kg of 0.9% saline for 20 min. On day 2 we initiated a continuous Pseudomonas aeruginosa infusion. Four hrs thereafter (early sepsis), and 24 hrs thereafter (late sepsis) we infused 25 mL/kg of 0.9% saline for 20 min. PVE was analyzed kinetically from decreases in Hemoglobin and initial plasma volumes measured using Evan's blue dye. Data were compared via repeated measures analysis of variance, with P<0.05 considered significant. Results: One sheep died during late sepsis. Plasma oncotic pressure decreased from 20.9±1.9 (baseline) to 17.3±0.7 (early) and to 13.9±1.6 mmHg (late sepsis). Systemic vascular resistance decreased from 1729±181 (baseline) to 1371±181 (early) and 1098±236 dyne sec cm-6 (late sepsis). Cardiac index increased from 5.1±0.7 (baseline) to 5.9±0.8 (early) and 7.8±1.6 L/min/m2 (late sepsis). PVE was 312± 87 mL, 386±64 mL and 400±88 mL for baseline, early and late sepsis, respectively, at the end of infusion and then decreased over 30 to 40 min to 97±30 mL, 151±72 mL and 103±82 mL, respectively. Urinary output and calculated extravascular fluid accumulation were not different among groups. Conclusion: Changed hemodynamics in the septic state do not change PVE in response to a crystalloid volume challenge.

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