Sequential outbreaks of infection due to Klebsiella pneumoniae in a neonatal intensive care unit: Implication of a conjugative R plasmid

S. M. Markowitz, J. M. Veazey, F. L. Macrina, C. G. Mayhall, V. A. Lamb

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

54 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Sequential outbreaks of infection in a neonatal intensive care unit were due to multiple antibiotic-resistant strains of Klebsiella pneumoniae of different serotypes. In investigations of these outbreaks, the transfer of resistance to gentamicin, ampicillin, cephalothin, carbenicillin, and kanamycin from gentamicin-resistant organisms to standard laboratory recipients and between recipients was observed. Purified plasmid DNA, isolated from all multiple antibiotic-resistant strains, was analyzed by agarose gel electrophoresis, which revealed a common, large plasmid component with a molecular size of 71 megadaltons. Analysis of drug-resistant progeny suggested this plasmid encoded resistance to antibiotics and the information needed for its transmission. The identity of the plasmid from three different sources was established by the use of restriction-enzyme fingerprinting. The dissemination and persistence of this plasmid in environmental and fecal organisms, despite the disappearance of multiple antibiotic-resistant K. pneumoniae, provided a potential source for spread to other bacteria.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)106-112
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Infectious Diseases
Volume142
Issue number1
StatePublished - 1980
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

R Factors
Neonatal Intensive Care Units
Klebsiella pneumoniae
Disease Outbreaks
Plasmids
Infection
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Gentamicins
Carbenicillin
Cephalothin
Kanamycin
Agar Gel Electrophoresis
Ampicillin
Microbial Drug Resistance
Bacteria
DNA
Enzymes
Pharmaceutical Preparations

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Immunology

Cite this

Sequential outbreaks of infection due to Klebsiella pneumoniae in a neonatal intensive care unit : Implication of a conjugative R plasmid. / Markowitz, S. M.; Veazey, J. M.; Macrina, F. L.; Mayhall, C. G.; Lamb, V. A.

In: Journal of Infectious Diseases, Vol. 142, No. 1, 1980, p. 106-112.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Markowitz, S. M. ; Veazey, J. M. ; Macrina, F. L. ; Mayhall, C. G. ; Lamb, V. A. / Sequential outbreaks of infection due to Klebsiella pneumoniae in a neonatal intensive care unit : Implication of a conjugative R plasmid. In: Journal of Infectious Diseases. 1980 ; Vol. 142, No. 1. pp. 106-112.
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