Serologic and genetic identification of Peromyscus maniculatus as the primary rodent reservoir for a new hantavirus in the southwestern United States

James E. Childs, Thomas Ksiazek, Christina F. Spiropoulou, John W. Krebs, Sergey Morzunov, Gary O. Maupin, Kenneth L. Gage, Pierre E. Rollin, John Sarisky, Russell E. Enscore, Jennifer K. Frey, C. J. Peters, Stuart T. Nichol

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

384 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

An outbreak of hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS) in the southwestern United States was etiologically linked to a newly recognized hantavirus. Knowledge that hantaviruses are maintained in rodent reservoirs stimulated a field and laboratory investigation of 1696 small mammals of 31 species. The most commonly captured rodent, the deer mouse (Peromyscus maniculatus), had the highest antibody prevalence (30%) to four hantavirus antigens. Antibody also was detected in 10 other species of rodent and in 1 species of rabbit. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) products of hantavirus from rodent tissues were indistinguishable from those from human HPS patients. More than 96% of the seropositive P. maniculatus were positive by RT-PCR, suggesting chronic infection. Antibody prevalences were similar among P. maniculatus trapped from Arizona (33%), New Mexico (29%), and Colorado (29%). The numeric dominance of P. maniculatus, the high prevalence of antibody, and the RT-PCR findings implicate this species as the primary rodent reservoir for a new hantavirus in the southwestern United States.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1271-1280
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Infectious Diseases
Volume169
Issue number6
StatePublished - Jun 1994
Externally publishedYes

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Southwestern United States
Peromyscus
Hantavirus
Rodentia
Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome
Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction
Antibodies
Disease Outbreaks
Mammals
Rabbits
Antigens
Infection

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Immunology

Cite this

Serologic and genetic identification of Peromyscus maniculatus as the primary rodent reservoir for a new hantavirus in the southwestern United States. / Childs, James E.; Ksiazek, Thomas; Spiropoulou, Christina F.; Krebs, John W.; Morzunov, Sergey; Maupin, Gary O.; Gage, Kenneth L.; Rollin, Pierre E.; Sarisky, John; Enscore, Russell E.; Frey, Jennifer K.; Peters, C. J.; Nichol, Stuart T.

In: Journal of Infectious Diseases, Vol. 169, No. 6, 06.1994, p. 1271-1280.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Childs, JE, Ksiazek, T, Spiropoulou, CF, Krebs, JW, Morzunov, S, Maupin, GO, Gage, KL, Rollin, PE, Sarisky, J, Enscore, RE, Frey, JK, Peters, CJ & Nichol, ST 1994, 'Serologic and genetic identification of Peromyscus maniculatus as the primary rodent reservoir for a new hantavirus in the southwestern United States', Journal of Infectious Diseases, vol. 169, no. 6, pp. 1271-1280.
Childs, James E. ; Ksiazek, Thomas ; Spiropoulou, Christina F. ; Krebs, John W. ; Morzunov, Sergey ; Maupin, Gary O. ; Gage, Kenneth L. ; Rollin, Pierre E. ; Sarisky, John ; Enscore, Russell E. ; Frey, Jennifer K. ; Peters, C. J. ; Nichol, Stuart T. / Serologic and genetic identification of Peromyscus maniculatus as the primary rodent reservoir for a new hantavirus in the southwestern United States. In: Journal of Infectious Diseases. 1994 ; Vol. 169, No. 6. pp. 1271-1280.
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