Serologic evidence of arboviral infections among humans in Kenya

Laura J. Sutherland, Ayla A. Cash, Yan Jang Scott Huang, Rosemary C. Sang, Indu Malhotra, Ann M. Moormann, Christopher L. King, Scott Weaver, Charles H. King, A. Desiree LaBeaud

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

36 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Outbreaks of arthropod-borne viral infections occur periodically across Kenya. However, limited surveillance takes place during interepidemic periods. Using serum samples obtained from asymptomatic persons across Kenya in 2000-2004, we assessed (by indirect immunofluorescent assay) prevalence of IgG against yellow fever virus (YFV), West Nile virus (WNV), tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV), dengue virus serotypes 1-4 (DENV1-4), and chikungunya virus (CHIKV). Older persons on the Indian Ocean coast were more likely to be seropositive than children inland: YFV = 42% versus 6%, WNV = 29% versus 6%, TBEV = 16% versus 6%, DENV-1 = 63% versus 9%, DENV-2 = 67% versus 7%, DENV-3 = 55% versus 6%, DENV-4 = 44% versus 8%, and CHIKV = 37% versus 20%. Among inland samples, children in lowlands were more likely to be seropositive for CHIKV (42% versus 0%) than children in highlands. In Kenya, transmission of arboviral infection continues between known epidemics and remains common across the country.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)158-161
Number of pages4
JournalAmerican Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene
Volume85
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2011

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Chikungunya virus
Kenya
Yellow fever virus
Tick-Borne Encephalitis Viruses
West Nile virus
Infection
Indian Ocean
Dengue Virus
Infectious Disease Transmission
Arthropods
Virus Diseases
Disease Outbreaks
Immunoglobulin G
Serum

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Parasitology
  • Infectious Diseases
  • Virology

Cite this

Sutherland, L. J., Cash, A. A., Huang, Y. J. S., Sang, R. C., Malhotra, I., Moormann, A. M., ... LaBeaud, A. D. (2011). Serologic evidence of arboviral infections among humans in Kenya. American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, 85(1), 158-161. https://doi.org/10.4269/ajtmh.2011.10-0203

Serologic evidence of arboviral infections among humans in Kenya. / Sutherland, Laura J.; Cash, Ayla A.; Huang, Yan Jang Scott; Sang, Rosemary C.; Malhotra, Indu; Moormann, Ann M.; King, Christopher L.; Weaver, Scott; King, Charles H.; LaBeaud, A. Desiree.

In: American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, Vol. 85, No. 1, 07.2011, p. 158-161.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sutherland, LJ, Cash, AA, Huang, YJS, Sang, RC, Malhotra, I, Moormann, AM, King, CL, Weaver, S, King, CH & LaBeaud, AD 2011, 'Serologic evidence of arboviral infections among humans in Kenya', American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, vol. 85, no. 1, pp. 158-161. https://doi.org/10.4269/ajtmh.2011.10-0203
Sutherland, Laura J. ; Cash, Ayla A. ; Huang, Yan Jang Scott ; Sang, Rosemary C. ; Malhotra, Indu ; Moormann, Ann M. ; King, Christopher L. ; Weaver, Scott ; King, Charles H. ; LaBeaud, A. Desiree. / Serologic evidence of arboviral infections among humans in Kenya. In: American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. 2011 ; Vol. 85, No. 1. pp. 158-161.
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