Serum immune activation markers are persistently increased in patients with HIV infection after 6 years of antiretroviral therapy despite suppression of viral replication and reconstitution of CD4+ T Cells

Martyn A. French, Martin S. King, Jean M. Tschampa, Barbara A. Da Silva, Alan L. Landay

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

197 Scopus citations

Abstract

The effect of long-term antiretroviral therapy on serum immune activation markers was assessed in a cohort of 63 patients before and after 6 years of boosted lopinavir - based antiretroviral therapy. High levels of most markers were associated with lower CD4+ T cell counts at baseline and at year 6, with the exception of soluble cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen-4 (sCTLA-4); high levels of sCTLA-4 were associated with higher CD4+ T cell counts at year 6. Abnormalities of serum immune activation markers persisted after 6 years of ART but probably had different causes. Further investigation of the clinical usefulness of assaying immunoglobulin A, neopterin, and sCTLA-4 levels to assess the effectiveness of treatments for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease are warranted.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1212-1215
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Infectious Diseases
Volume200
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 15 2009
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Infectious Diseases

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