Sevelamer does not decrease lipopolysaccharide or soluble cd14 levels but decreases soluble tissue factor, low-density lipoprotein (ldl) cholesterol, and oxidized ldl cholesterol levels in individuals with untreated hiv infection

Netanya G. Sandler, Xinyan Zhang, Ronald J. Bosch, Nicholas T. Funderburg, Andrew I. Choi, Janet K. Robinson, Derek M. Fine, Robert W. Coombs, Jeffrey M. Jacobson, Alan L. Landay, Daniel C. Douek, Randall Tressler, Sarah W. Read, Cara C. Wilson, Steven G. Deeks, Michael M. Lederman, Rajesh T. Gandhi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

47 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Abnormal levels of inflammation are associated with cardiovascular disease and mortality in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients. Microbial translocation, which may cause inflammation, is decreased by sevelamer in patients undergoing hemodialysis. In this single-arm study, we evaluated the effects of 8 weeks of sevelamer therapy on 36 HIV-infected subjects who were not receiving antiretroviral therapy. Sevelamer did not significantly change markers of microbial translocation, inflammation, or T-cell activation. During sevelamer treatment, however, levels of soluble tissue factor, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, and oxidized LDL cholesterol decreased significantly, whereas D-dimer levels increased. Thus, in this study population, sevelamer did not reduce microbial translocation but may have yielded cardiovascular benefits.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1549-1554
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Infectious Diseases
Volume210
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 15 2014

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Thromboplastin
LDL Cholesterol
Lipopolysaccharides
Infection
Inflammation
HIV
Renal Dialysis
Cardiovascular Diseases
Therapeutics
oxidized low density lipoprotein
Sevelamer
T-Lymphocytes
Mortality
Population

Keywords

  • HIV
  • LDL
  • LPS
  • microbial translocation
  • oxLDL.
  • sCD14
  • sevelamer
  • soluble tissue factor

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Infectious Diseases
  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Sevelamer does not decrease lipopolysaccharide or soluble cd14 levels but decreases soluble tissue factor, low-density lipoprotein (ldl) cholesterol, and oxidized ldl cholesterol levels in individuals with untreated hiv infection. / Sandler, Netanya G.; Zhang, Xinyan; Bosch, Ronald J.; Funderburg, Nicholas T.; Choi, Andrew I.; Robinson, Janet K.; Fine, Derek M.; Coombs, Robert W.; Jacobson, Jeffrey M.; Landay, Alan L.; Douek, Daniel C.; Tressler, Randall; Read, Sarah W.; Wilson, Cara C.; Deeks, Steven G.; Lederman, Michael M.; Gandhi, Rajesh T.

In: Journal of Infectious Diseases, Vol. 210, No. 10, 15.11.2014, p. 1549-1554.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sandler, NG, Zhang, X, Bosch, RJ, Funderburg, NT, Choi, AI, Robinson, JK, Fine, DM, Coombs, RW, Jacobson, JM, Landay, AL, Douek, DC, Tressler, R, Read, SW, Wilson, CC, Deeks, SG, Lederman, MM & Gandhi, RT 2014, 'Sevelamer does not decrease lipopolysaccharide or soluble cd14 levels but decreases soluble tissue factor, low-density lipoprotein (ldl) cholesterol, and oxidized ldl cholesterol levels in individuals with untreated hiv infection', Journal of Infectious Diseases, vol. 210, no. 10, pp. 1549-1554. https://doi.org/10.1093/infdis/jiu305
Sandler, Netanya G. ; Zhang, Xinyan ; Bosch, Ronald J. ; Funderburg, Nicholas T. ; Choi, Andrew I. ; Robinson, Janet K. ; Fine, Derek M. ; Coombs, Robert W. ; Jacobson, Jeffrey M. ; Landay, Alan L. ; Douek, Daniel C. ; Tressler, Randall ; Read, Sarah W. ; Wilson, Cara C. ; Deeks, Steven G. ; Lederman, Michael M. ; Gandhi, Rajesh T. / Sevelamer does not decrease lipopolysaccharide or soluble cd14 levels but decreases soluble tissue factor, low-density lipoprotein (ldl) cholesterol, and oxidized ldl cholesterol levels in individuals with untreated hiv infection. In: Journal of Infectious Diseases. 2014 ; Vol. 210, No. 10. pp. 1549-1554.
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