Short-term results of changes in existing and de novo lower urinary tract symptoms after robot-assisted laparoscopic uterosacral ligament suspension and sacrocolpopexy

Mertihan Kurdoglu, Serdar Unlu, Megan Antonetti-Elford, Zehra Kurdoglu, Gokhan Kilic

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: This study presents short-term outcomes related to changes in existing and de novo lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS), pelvic pain, and bowel function following robot-assisted laparoscopic ute rosacral ligament suspension (RALUSLS) and sacrocolpopexy (RALSC). Methods: Observational data for RALUSLS (n = 23) and RALSC (n = 25) collected between August 2014 and March 2016 from a single institute (The University of Texas Medical Branch) were evaluated retrospectively. Patient characteristics, concomitant procedures, and the occurrence of lower urinary tract, pelvic pain, and bowel symptoms were compared between patients undergoing RALUSLS and RALSC. Results: There was no significant difference in background characteristics between the 2 groups, except for parity, which was high in the RALUSLS group. In the RALUSLS group, patients experienced significant resolution of urinary urgency (P <.001) and frequency, urge and mixed incontinence, and pelvic pain (P <.05). In the RALSC group, there was significant resolution of nocturia, mixed incontinence, pelvic pain, and dyspareunia (P <.05). There was no significant difference in the occurrence of de novo symptoms in the RALUSLS and RALSC groups (P >.05), although newly appearing urinary urgency or frequency and stress or urge incontinence were more common after RALSC. Conclusion: Mixed incontinence and pelvic pain improved significantly in patients after RALUSLS or RALSC. In RALUSLS patients, urgency, frequency, and urge incontinence also improved, whereas additional improvement in nocturia and dyspareunia was evident only in RALSC patients. De novo LUTS developing after these procedures, especially after RALSC, necessitate careful patient consultation prior to surgery.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)O71-O77
JournalLUTS: Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms
Volume11
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2019

Fingerprint

Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms
Ligaments
Suspensions
Pelvic Pain
Urge Urinary Incontinence
Nocturia
Dyspareunia
Parity
Urinary Tract
Referral and Consultation

Keywords

  • digestive signs and symptoms
  • lower urinary tract symptoms
  • pelvic pain
  • prolapse
  • robotics
  • surgical procedures

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neurology
  • Urology

Cite this

Short-term results of changes in existing and de novo lower urinary tract symptoms after robot-assisted laparoscopic uterosacral ligament suspension and sacrocolpopexy. / Kurdoglu, Mertihan; Unlu, Serdar; Antonetti-Elford, Megan; Kurdoglu, Zehra; Kilic, Gokhan.

In: LUTS: Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms, Vol. 11, No. 2, 01.04.2019, p. O71-O77.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Objective: This study presents short-term outcomes related to changes in existing and de novo lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS), pelvic pain, and bowel function following robot-assisted laparoscopic ute rosacral ligament suspension (RALUSLS) and sacrocolpopexy (RALSC). Methods: Observational data for RALUSLS (n = 23) and RALSC (n = 25) collected between August 2014 and March 2016 from a single institute (The University of Texas Medical Branch) were evaluated retrospectively. Patient characteristics, concomitant procedures, and the occurrence of lower urinary tract, pelvic pain, and bowel symptoms were compared between patients undergoing RALUSLS and RALSC. Results: There was no significant difference in background characteristics between the 2 groups, except for parity, which was high in the RALUSLS group. In the RALUSLS group, patients experienced significant resolution of urinary urgency (P <.001) and frequency, urge and mixed incontinence, and pelvic pain (P <.05). In the RALSC group, there was significant resolution of nocturia, mixed incontinence, pelvic pain, and dyspareunia (P <.05). There was no significant difference in the occurrence of de novo symptoms in the RALUSLS and RALSC groups (P >.05), although newly appearing urinary urgency or frequency and stress or urge incontinence were more common after RALSC. Conclusion: Mixed incontinence and pelvic pain improved significantly in patients after RALUSLS or RALSC. In RALUSLS patients, urgency, frequency, and urge incontinence also improved, whereas additional improvement in nocturia and dyspareunia was evident only in RALSC patients. De novo LUTS developing after these procedures, especially after RALSC, necessitate careful patient consultation prior to surgery.",
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