Shorter stay, longer life

Age at migration and mortality among the older Mexican-origin population

Ronald J. Angel, Jacqueline L. Angel, Carlos Díaz Venegas, Claude Bonazzo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

37 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: In this article, we investigate the association between age at migration and mortality during a 13-year period in a sample of Mexican American immigrants 65 and older at baseline. Method: We employ the Hispanic Established Populations for Epidemiologic Studies of the Elderly (H-PESE) to control for mortality-related health and social factors. Results: Our analyses show that the immigrant generation does not represent a homogeneous mortality risk category. Individuals who migrated to the United States in mature adulthood have a considerably lower risk of death than individuals who migrated in childhood or midlife. Chronic conditions or functional capacity do not account for these differences. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that standard risk pools may differ significantly on the basis of genetic and unmeasured life-course factors. A better understanding of the late-life immigrant mortality advantage has important implications for more effective and targeted social and medical interventions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)914-931
Number of pages18
JournalJournal of Aging and Health
Volume22
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2010
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

mortality
migration
Mortality
immigrant
Population
Hispanic Americans
adulthood
social factors
Epidemiologic Studies
childhood
death
Health
health

Keywords

  • living arrangements
  • Mexico
  • migration

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Gerontology
  • Community and Home Care

Cite this

Shorter stay, longer life : Age at migration and mortality among the older Mexican-origin population. / Angel, Ronald J.; Angel, Jacqueline L.; Díaz Venegas, Carlos; Bonazzo, Claude.

In: Journal of Aging and Health, Vol. 22, No. 7, 10.2010, p. 914-931.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Angel, Ronald J. ; Angel, Jacqueline L. ; Díaz Venegas, Carlos ; Bonazzo, Claude. / Shorter stay, longer life : Age at migration and mortality among the older Mexican-origin population. In: Journal of Aging and Health. 2010 ; Vol. 22, No. 7. pp. 914-931.
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