Signal transduction in T helper cells

CD4 coreceptors exert complex regulatory effects on T cell activation and function

Rolf König, Wenhong Zhou

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The immune system provides a highly sophisticated surveillance mechanism to detect diverse antigens and to protect the host organism from invading pathogens and altered cells (e.g., virus-infected and tumor cells). Adaptive immune responses depend on the recognition of antigen by specific antigen receptors that are expressed on the surface of T and B lymphocytes. Helper T cells provide regulatory functions and direct the adaptive immune system to respond appropriately to a particular antigen (i.e., cytotoxic T cell responses against viral infections and tumor cells, humoral responses against extracellular bacteria and parasitic worms). Helper T cells express CD4 coreceptors, which recognize conserved domains on proteins expressed by the class II major histocompatibility complex, the same proteins that present antigen to the T cell receptor. Recent progress in T cell biology has identified multiple regulatory functions of CD4 during thymocyte development and antigen stimulation of mature T helper cells. Signaling pathways induced by engagement of CD4 independently of T cell receptor signaling mediate these regulatory functions. In this review, we discuss the regulation of T cell signaling and emphasize the functional consequences of proper and improper CD4 coreceptor signallng.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-16
Number of pages16
JournalCurrent Issues in Molecular Biology
Volume6
Issue number1
StatePublished - Jan 2004

Fingerprint

Helper-Inducer T-Lymphocytes
Signal Transduction
T-Lymphocytes
Antigens
T-Cell Antigen Receptor
Immune System
Oncogenic Viruses
Antigen Receptors
Helminths
Adaptive Immunity
Virus Diseases
Thymocytes
Major Histocompatibility Complex
Cell Biology
B-Lymphocytes
Bacteria
Neoplasms
Proteins

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Biology
  • Cell Biology

Cite this

Signal transduction in T helper cells : CD4 coreceptors exert complex regulatory effects on T cell activation and function. / König, Rolf; Zhou, Wenhong.

In: Current Issues in Molecular Biology, Vol. 6, No. 1, 01.2004, p. 1-16.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{6a69a4b3a38b4e038237f679b7d3aa56,
title = "Signal transduction in T helper cells: CD4 coreceptors exert complex regulatory effects on T cell activation and function",
abstract = "The immune system provides a highly sophisticated surveillance mechanism to detect diverse antigens and to protect the host organism from invading pathogens and altered cells (e.g., virus-infected and tumor cells). Adaptive immune responses depend on the recognition of antigen by specific antigen receptors that are expressed on the surface of T and B lymphocytes. Helper T cells provide regulatory functions and direct the adaptive immune system to respond appropriately to a particular antigen (i.e., cytotoxic T cell responses against viral infections and tumor cells, humoral responses against extracellular bacteria and parasitic worms). Helper T cells express CD4 coreceptors, which recognize conserved domains on proteins expressed by the class II major histocompatibility complex, the same proteins that present antigen to the T cell receptor. Recent progress in T cell biology has identified multiple regulatory functions of CD4 during thymocyte development and antigen stimulation of mature T helper cells. Signaling pathways induced by engagement of CD4 independently of T cell receptor signaling mediate these regulatory functions. In this review, we discuss the regulation of T cell signaling and emphasize the functional consequences of proper and improper CD4 coreceptor signallng.",
author = "Rolf K{\"o}nig and Wenhong Zhou",
year = "2004",
month = "1",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "6",
pages = "1--16",
journal = "Current Issues in Molecular Biology",
issn = "1467-3037",
publisher = "Caister Academic Press",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Signal transduction in T helper cells

T2 - CD4 coreceptors exert complex regulatory effects on T cell activation and function

AU - König, Rolf

AU - Zhou, Wenhong

PY - 2004/1

Y1 - 2004/1

N2 - The immune system provides a highly sophisticated surveillance mechanism to detect diverse antigens and to protect the host organism from invading pathogens and altered cells (e.g., virus-infected and tumor cells). Adaptive immune responses depend on the recognition of antigen by specific antigen receptors that are expressed on the surface of T and B lymphocytes. Helper T cells provide regulatory functions and direct the adaptive immune system to respond appropriately to a particular antigen (i.e., cytotoxic T cell responses against viral infections and tumor cells, humoral responses against extracellular bacteria and parasitic worms). Helper T cells express CD4 coreceptors, which recognize conserved domains on proteins expressed by the class II major histocompatibility complex, the same proteins that present antigen to the T cell receptor. Recent progress in T cell biology has identified multiple regulatory functions of CD4 during thymocyte development and antigen stimulation of mature T helper cells. Signaling pathways induced by engagement of CD4 independently of T cell receptor signaling mediate these regulatory functions. In this review, we discuss the regulation of T cell signaling and emphasize the functional consequences of proper and improper CD4 coreceptor signallng.

AB - The immune system provides a highly sophisticated surveillance mechanism to detect diverse antigens and to protect the host organism from invading pathogens and altered cells (e.g., virus-infected and tumor cells). Adaptive immune responses depend on the recognition of antigen by specific antigen receptors that are expressed on the surface of T and B lymphocytes. Helper T cells provide regulatory functions and direct the adaptive immune system to respond appropriately to a particular antigen (i.e., cytotoxic T cell responses against viral infections and tumor cells, humoral responses against extracellular bacteria and parasitic worms). Helper T cells express CD4 coreceptors, which recognize conserved domains on proteins expressed by the class II major histocompatibility complex, the same proteins that present antigen to the T cell receptor. Recent progress in T cell biology has identified multiple regulatory functions of CD4 during thymocyte development and antigen stimulation of mature T helper cells. Signaling pathways induced by engagement of CD4 independently of T cell receptor signaling mediate these regulatory functions. In this review, we discuss the regulation of T cell signaling and emphasize the functional consequences of proper and improper CD4 coreceptor signallng.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0344876109&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0344876109&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 6

SP - 1

EP - 16

JO - Current Issues in Molecular Biology

JF - Current Issues in Molecular Biology

SN - 1467-3037

IS - 1

ER -