Significance of violence in stories of young children

Kelli McCarley, Dale L. Johnson, Constance D. Baldwin, David P. McCormick

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Stories told by 72 5-yt.-old children were scored for themes of violence and correlated with their mothers' reports of aggressive or fearful behaviors. Values for the entire sample were not significant. However, when data for Hispanic children were removed from the sample the correlation of violent stories to ratings of children's aggression was significant (r = .27) and for a count of violent words r = .30. The correlation of violent words to fearfulness was .28 and for girls only .35. The count of violent words was also correlated with African-American children's ratings of fearfulness (r = .64).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)222-224
Number of pages3
JournalPsychological Reports
Volume93
Issue number1
StatePublished - Aug 2003
Externally publishedYes

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

McCarley, K., Johnson, D. L., Baldwin, C. D., & McCormick, D. P. (2003). Significance of violence in stories of young children. Psychological Reports, 93(1), 222-224.