Sildenafil Increases Muscle Protein Synthesis and Reduces Muscle Fatigue

Melinda Sheffield-Moore, John E. Wiktorowicz, Kizhake V. Soman, Christopher P. Danesi, Michael Kinsky, Edgar Dillon, Kathleen M. Randolph, Shannon L. Casperson, Dennis Gore, Astrid M. Horstman, James P. Lynch, Barbara M. Doucet, Joni A. Mettler, Jeffrey W. Ryder, Lori L. Ploutz-Snyder, Jean W. Hsu, Farook Jahoor, Kristofer Jennings, Gregory R. White, Susan D. MccammonWilliam J. Durham

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Reductions in skeletal muscle function occur during the course of healthy aging as well as with bed rest or diverse diseases such as cancer, muscular dystrophy, and heart failure. However, there are no accepted pharmacologic therapies to improve impaired skeletal muscle function. Nitric oxide may influence skeletal muscle function through effects on excitation-contraction coupling, myofibrillar function, perfusion, and metabolism. Here we show that augmentation of nitric oxide-cyclic guanosine monophosphate signaling by short-term daily administration of the phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitor sildenafil increases protein synthesis, alters protein expression and nitrosylation, and reduces fatigue in human skeletal muscle. These findings suggest that phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors represent viable pharmacologic interventions to improve muscle function.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)463-468
Number of pages6
JournalClinical and Translational Science
Volume6
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2013

Fingerprint

Muscle Fatigue
Muscle Proteins
Muscle
Skeletal Muscle
Fatigue of materials
Phosphodiesterase 5 Inhibitors
Nitric Oxide
Excitation Contraction Coupling
Bed Rest
Muscular Dystrophies
Hospital beds
Cyclic GMP
Fatigue
Proteins
Metabolism
Heart Failure
Perfusion
Muscles
Aging of materials
Sildenafil Citrate

Keywords

  • Exercise
  • Metabolism
  • Protein S-nitrosylation
  • Translational research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutics(all)

Cite this

Sheffield-Moore, M., Wiktorowicz, J. E., Soman, K. V., Danesi, C. P., Kinsky, M., Dillon, E., ... Durham, W. J. (2013). Sildenafil Increases Muscle Protein Synthesis and Reduces Muscle Fatigue. Clinical and Translational Science, 6(6), 463-468. https://doi.org/10.1111/cts.12121

Sildenafil Increases Muscle Protein Synthesis and Reduces Muscle Fatigue. / Sheffield-Moore, Melinda; Wiktorowicz, John E.; Soman, Kizhake V.; Danesi, Christopher P.; Kinsky, Michael; Dillon, Edgar; Randolph, Kathleen M.; Casperson, Shannon L.; Gore, Dennis; Horstman, Astrid M.; Lynch, James P.; Doucet, Barbara M.; Mettler, Joni A.; Ryder, Jeffrey W.; Ploutz-Snyder, Lori L.; Hsu, Jean W.; Jahoor, Farook; Jennings, Kristofer; White, Gregory R.; Mccammon, Susan D.; Durham, William J.

In: Clinical and Translational Science, Vol. 6, No. 6, 12.2013, p. 463-468.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sheffield-Moore, M, Wiktorowicz, JE, Soman, KV, Danesi, CP, Kinsky, M, Dillon, E, Randolph, KM, Casperson, SL, Gore, D, Horstman, AM, Lynch, JP, Doucet, BM, Mettler, JA, Ryder, JW, Ploutz-Snyder, LL, Hsu, JW, Jahoor, F, Jennings, K, White, GR, Mccammon, SD & Durham, WJ 2013, 'Sildenafil Increases Muscle Protein Synthesis and Reduces Muscle Fatigue', Clinical and Translational Science, vol. 6, no. 6, pp. 463-468. https://doi.org/10.1111/cts.12121
Sheffield-Moore, Melinda ; Wiktorowicz, John E. ; Soman, Kizhake V. ; Danesi, Christopher P. ; Kinsky, Michael ; Dillon, Edgar ; Randolph, Kathleen M. ; Casperson, Shannon L. ; Gore, Dennis ; Horstman, Astrid M. ; Lynch, James P. ; Doucet, Barbara M. ; Mettler, Joni A. ; Ryder, Jeffrey W. ; Ploutz-Snyder, Lori L. ; Hsu, Jean W. ; Jahoor, Farook ; Jennings, Kristofer ; White, Gregory R. ; Mccammon, Susan D. ; Durham, William J. / Sildenafil Increases Muscle Protein Synthesis and Reduces Muscle Fatigue. In: Clinical and Translational Science. 2013 ; Vol. 6, No. 6. pp. 463-468.
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