Slow intramural heating with diffused laser light

A unique method for deep myocardial coagulation

David L. Ware, Paul Boor, Chunjie Yang, Ashok Gowda, James J. Grady, Massoud Motamedi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background - Catheter ablation of postinfarction ventricular tachycardia (VT) may be limited by insufficient myocardial coagulation or excessive endocardial or epicardial damage. We propose that volumetric heating restricted to intramural sites may improve the outcome and safety of this procedure, especially if delivered at rates that enhance heat conduction and forestall adverse tissue changes. Methods and Results - A novel optical fiber with a diffusing tip for direct intramural, volumetric laser heating was tested via thoracotomy and percutaneously in normal dogs. Low-power (2.0- to 4.5-W) diode laser light (805 nm) diffused within tissue induced large lesions but no visible surface damage, mural thrombi, or transmural perforation. Mean lesion depth approximated tip length (10 mm). Mean lesion widths in the thoracotomy and percutaneous groups were 5.8±0.5 to 9.1±0.84 mm and 5.2±0.85 to 7.9±1.1 mm, respectively, depending on the light dose. Mean volumes in the percutaneous group were 1006±245 to 2471±934 mm. ST- segment depression, appearing in unfiltered bipolar electrograms recorded from the guiding catheter, was specific for lesion induction. All dogs survived the protocol, which included a 1-hour observation period. In cross section, lesions were elliptical to spherical and characterized by extensive contraction-band necrosis abruptly bordering viable tissue. No platelets or fibrin adhered to the endocardium. Conclusions - Slow, volumetric, and direct intramyocardial heating induces large, deep lesions without hazardous tissue damage. Such heating might cure postinfarction VT more successfully and safely than present techniques. Further testing and development of this method seem warranted.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1630-1636
Number of pages7
JournalCirculation
Volume99
Issue number12
StatePublished - Mar 30 1999

Fingerprint

Heating
Lasers
Light
Thoracotomy
Ventricular Tachycardia
Dogs
Optical Fibers
Endocardium
Semiconductor Lasers
Catheter Ablation
Fibrin
Thrombosis
Necrosis
Blood Platelets
Catheters
Hot Temperature
Observation
Safety

Keywords

  • Coagulation
  • Lasers
  • Tachycardia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Ware, D. L., Boor, P., Yang, C., Gowda, A., Grady, J. J., & Motamedi, M. (1999). Slow intramural heating with diffused laser light: A unique method for deep myocardial coagulation. Circulation, 99(12), 1630-1636.

Slow intramural heating with diffused laser light : A unique method for deep myocardial coagulation. / Ware, David L.; Boor, Paul; Yang, Chunjie; Gowda, Ashok; Grady, James J.; Motamedi, Massoud.

In: Circulation, Vol. 99, No. 12, 30.03.1999, p. 1630-1636.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ware, DL, Boor, P, Yang, C, Gowda, A, Grady, JJ & Motamedi, M 1999, 'Slow intramural heating with diffused laser light: A unique method for deep myocardial coagulation', Circulation, vol. 99, no. 12, pp. 1630-1636.
Ware, David L. ; Boor, Paul ; Yang, Chunjie ; Gowda, Ashok ; Grady, James J. ; Motamedi, Massoud. / Slow intramural heating with diffused laser light : A unique method for deep myocardial coagulation. In: Circulation. 1999 ; Vol. 99, No. 12. pp. 1630-1636.
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