Small-volume resuscitation with hypertonic saline dextran solution

George Kramer, P. R. Perron, D. C. Lindsey, H. S. Ho, R. A. Gunther, W. A. Boyle, J. W. Holcroft

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

212 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Small-volume hypertonic resuscitation has been proposed as an effective means for restoration of cardiovascular function after hemorrhage at the scene of an accident. We evaluated the cardiovascular, metabolic, and neurohumoral response of resuscitation after hemorrhage using 200 ml of 2400 mosm sodium chloride, 6% dextran 70. Unanesthetized adult sheep were bled to maintain mean arterial pressure at 50 mm Hg for 3 hours, shed blood volume = 42 ± 7 ml/kg. The sheep were then treated with a single bolus infusion of hypertonic saline dextran (n = 7) or normal saline solution (control group, n = 7) and then observed for a 30-minute period of simulated patient transport during which no additional fluid was given. Hypertonic saline dextran caused rapid restoration of blood pressure and cardiac output within 2 minutes of infusion. Cardiac output remained at or above baseline level, while both O2 consumption and urine output increased to above baseline level during the 30 minutes of simulated patient transport. By comparison 200 ml of normal saline solution caused only a small increase in blood pressure and no improvement in cardiac output or oxygen consumption. After this 30-minute period, both groups were given lactated Ringer's solution as needed to return and maintain cardiac output at its baseline value. The volume of lactated Ringer's solution required to maintain cardiac output was less in the hypertonic group, 371 ± 168 ml, only one sixth that of the control group, 2200 ± 814 ml. In summary after 3 hours of hypovolemia, a small volume of hypertonic saline dextran, about 4 ml/kg, fully restored cardiovascular and metabolic function for at least 30 minutes and significantly lowered the total volume requirements of resuscitation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)239-247
Number of pages9
JournalSurgery
Volume100
Issue number2
StatePublished - 1986
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

dextran - saline drug combination
Resuscitation
Cardiac Output
Sodium Chloride
Sheep
Hemorrhage
Blood Pressure
Control Groups
Hypovolemia
Dextrans
Blood Volume
Oxygen Consumption
Accidents
Arterial Pressure
hypertonic saline-dextran solution
Urine
Ringer's solution
Ringer's lactate

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Kramer, G., Perron, P. R., Lindsey, D. C., Ho, H. S., Gunther, R. A., Boyle, W. A., & Holcroft, J. W. (1986). Small-volume resuscitation with hypertonic saline dextran solution. Surgery, 100(2), 239-247.

Small-volume resuscitation with hypertonic saline dextran solution. / Kramer, George; Perron, P. R.; Lindsey, D. C.; Ho, H. S.; Gunther, R. A.; Boyle, W. A.; Holcroft, J. W.

In: Surgery, Vol. 100, No. 2, 1986, p. 239-247.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kramer, G, Perron, PR, Lindsey, DC, Ho, HS, Gunther, RA, Boyle, WA & Holcroft, JW 1986, 'Small-volume resuscitation with hypertonic saline dextran solution', Surgery, vol. 100, no. 2, pp. 239-247.
Kramer G, Perron PR, Lindsey DC, Ho HS, Gunther RA, Boyle WA et al. Small-volume resuscitation with hypertonic saline dextran solution. Surgery. 1986;100(2):239-247.
Kramer, George ; Perron, P. R. ; Lindsey, D. C. ; Ho, H. S. ; Gunther, R. A. ; Boyle, W. A. ; Holcroft, J. W. / Small-volume resuscitation with hypertonic saline dextran solution. In: Surgery. 1986 ; Vol. 100, No. 2. pp. 239-247.
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