So, He's a Little Premature...What's the Big Deal?

M. Terese Verklan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Health care providers have recently recognized that a large segment of the morbidity associated with preterm birth is disproportionately due to the late preterm infant (LPI). One explanation is that this population is the fastest-growing sector of all preterm births. This article describes the epidemiology and etiology of the LPI, and discusses why the LPI is at an increased risk for complications, such as thermal instability, hypoglycemia, feeding difficulties, respiratory distress, hyperbilirubinemia, and sepsis. The need for emergency department visits after hospital discharge and what is currently known regarding neurodevelopmental outcomes are also presented.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)149-161
Number of pages13
JournalCritical Care Nursing Clinics of North America
Volume21
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2009
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Premature Birth
Hyperbilirubinemia
Hypoglycemia
Premature Infants
Health Personnel
Hospital Emergency Service
Sepsis
Epidemiology
Hot Temperature
Morbidity
Population

Keywords

  • Feeding difficulties
  • Hyperbilirubinemia
  • Hypoglycemia
  • LPI
  • Respiratory distress
  • Sepsis
  • Thermal instability

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Critical Care

Cite this

So, He's a Little Premature...What's the Big Deal? / Verklan, M. Terese.

In: Critical Care Nursing Clinics of North America, Vol. 21, No. 2, 06.2009, p. 149-161.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Verklan, M. Terese. / So, He's a Little Premature...What's the Big Deal?. In: Critical Care Nursing Clinics of North America. 2009 ; Vol. 21, No. 2. pp. 149-161.
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