Socioeconomic factors associated with Fasciola hepatica infection among children from 26 communities of the cusco region of Peru

Miguel Cabada, Maria Luisa Morales, Camille M. Webb, Logan Yang, Chelsey A. Bravenec, Martha Lopez, Ruben Bascope, A. Clinton White, Eduardo Gotuzzo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Fasciola hepatica is the most widely distributed trematode-affecting humans. The Andes Mountains are highly endemic for fascioliasis. We report results of a cross-sectional study evaluating the epidemiology of Fasciola among children in 26 agricultural communities in the Cusco region of Peru. Children 3 to 16 years old were enrolled in preschools and schools. Blood from participants was tested for complete blood counts, transaminases, and Fasciola antibodies. Stool samples were tested for Fasciola and other parasites. A total of 2,515 children were included in the analysis and the mean age was 9.6 years (±3.6). Ten percent (253) of the children had at least one positive test for Fasciola, 6% had chronic infection, and 0.4% acute infection. The rest of the subjects had only antibodies against Fasciola. The prevalence of infection varied from 0% to 20% between communities. Children with evidence of Fasciola exposure were older, lived at higher altitudes, and had a lower socioeconomic status than children without infection. The logistic regression analysis showed that children from Ancahuasi district, older children, and children with higher measures of poverty were more likely to have Fasciola exposure. Fascioliasis is common in the Cusco region and associated with poverty. However, the distribution varies markedly between communities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1180-1185
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene
Volume99
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2018

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Fasciola hepatica
Peru
Fasciola
Infection
Fascioliasis
Poverty
Blood Cell Count
Antibodies
Transaminases
Social Class
Parasites
Epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Logistic Models
Regression Analysis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Parasitology
  • Infectious Diseases
  • Virology

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Socioeconomic factors associated with Fasciola hepatica infection among children from 26 communities of the cusco region of Peru. / Cabada, Miguel; Morales, Maria Luisa; Webb, Camille M.; Yang, Logan; Bravenec, Chelsey A.; Lopez, Martha; Bascope, Ruben; White, A. Clinton; Gotuzzo, Eduardo.

In: American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, Vol. 99, No. 5, 01.01.2018, p. 1180-1185.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Cabada, Miguel ; Morales, Maria Luisa ; Webb, Camille M. ; Yang, Logan ; Bravenec, Chelsey A. ; Lopez, Martha ; Bascope, Ruben ; White, A. Clinton ; Gotuzzo, Eduardo. / Socioeconomic factors associated with Fasciola hepatica infection among children from 26 communities of the cusco region of Peru. In: American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. 2018 ; Vol. 99, No. 5. pp. 1180-1185.
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