Sparse evidence of MERS-CoV infection among animal workers living in Southern Saudi Arabia during 2012

Ziad A. Memish, Ahmad Alsahly, Malak al Masri, Gary L. Heil, Benjamin D. Anderson, Malik Peiris, Salah Uddin Khan, Gregory C. Gray

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

30 Scopus citations

Abstract

Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) is an emerging viral pathogen that primarily causes respiratory illness. We conducted a seroprevalence study of banked human serum samples collected in 2012 from Southern Saudi Arabia. Sera from 300 animal workers (17% with daily camel exposure) and 50 non-animal-exposed controls were examined for serological evidence of MERS-CoV infection by a pseudoparticle MERS-CoV spike protein neutralization assay. None of the sera reproducibly neutralized the MERS-CoV-pseudotyped lentiviral vector. These data suggest that serological evidence of zoonotic transmission of MERS-CoV was not common among animal workers in Southern Saudi Arabia during July 2012.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)64-67
Number of pages4
JournalInfluenza and other respiratory viruses
Volume9
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2015
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Antibody
  • Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
  • MERS-CoV
  • Pseudoparticle virus neutralization assays

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Infectious Diseases

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