Spectral-domain optical coherence tomography angiography of choroidal neovascularization

Talisa E. De Carlo, Marco A. Bonini Filho, Adam T. Chin, Mehreen Adhi, Daniela Ferrara, Caroline R. Baumal, Andre J. Witkin, Elias Reichel, Jay S. Duker, Nadia K. Waheed

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

337 Scopus citations

Abstract

Purpose To describe the characteristics as well as the sensitivity and specificity of detection of choroidal neovascularization (CNV) on optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA) using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography. Design Observational, retrospective study. Participants Seventy-two eyes of 61 subjects (48 eyes of 43 subjects with CNV, 24 eyes of 18 subjects without CNV). Methods Patients imaged using the prototype AngioVue OCTA system (Optovue, Inc, Fremont, CA) between August 2014 and October 2014 at New England Eye Center were assessed. Patients in whom CNV was identified on OCTA were evaluated to define characteristics of CNV on OCTA: size using greatest linear dimension (small, <1 mm; medium, 1-2 mm; large, >2 mm), appearance (well-circumscribed, poorly circumscribed), and presence of subretinal and intraretinal fluid. Concurrently, an overlapping second cohort of patients who underwent same-day OCTA and fluorescein angiography (FA) for suspected CNV was evaluated to estimate sensitivity and specificity of OCTA in detecting CNV using FA as ground truth. Main Outcome Measures Choroidal neovascularization appearance, CNV size, and presence of subretinal and intraretinal fluid. Results In 48 eyes, CNV was visualized on OCTA. Thirty-one eyes had CNV associated with neovascular age-related macular degeneration. Size of CNV was small in 23% (7/31), medium in 42% (13/31), and large in 35% (11/31). Poorly circumscribed vessels, subretinal fluid, and intraretinal fluid each were seen in 71% (22/31). Seven eyes had CNV associated with central serous chorioretinopathy. Size of CNV was small in 71% (5/7) and large in 29% (2/7). Seventy-one percent (5/7) had well-circumscribed vessels, 86% (6/7) had subretinal fluid, and 14% (1/7) had intraretinal fluid. Thirty eyes with OCTA and same-day FA were evaluated to determine sensitivity and specificity of CNV detection on OCTA. Sensitivity was 50% (4/8) and specificity was 91% (20/22). Conclusions Using OCTA allows the clinician to visualize CNV noninvasively and may provide a method for identifying and guiding treatment of CNV. The specificity of CNV detection on OCTA compared with FA seems to be high. Future studies with larger sample sizes are needed to elaborate better on the sensitivity and specificity of CNV detection and to illustrate clinical usefulness.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1228-1238
Number of pages11
JournalOphthalmology
Volume122
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2015
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology

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