Speed- and cane-related alterations in gait parameters in individuals with multiple sclerosis

Milena A. Gianfrancesco, Elizabeth W. Triche, Jennifer A. Fawcett, Michele P. Labas, Tara S. Patterson, Albert C. Lo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

26 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Previous literature reporting gait parameters in the MS population has largely focused on preferred walking speed without the use of an assistive device. However, these data may not fully represent daily activity, as individuals with MS vary their speed or use a cane when walking. In this exploratory study, 11 MS participants and 13 controls walked at both maximal and preferred speed for a distance of 25-feet. Participants with MS that used a cane daily (. n= 6) were asked to complete additional trials with their cane. When walking unassisted at both speeds, MS participants displayed significantly reduced velocity, cadence, stride length, step length ratio, single support and swing time, as well as increased double support and stance time compared to controls. Cane use resulted in significantly higher velocities when walking at maximal speeds, and showed significantly improved variability, gait asymmetry, and bilateral coordination at preferred walking speed. In conclusion, the use of a cane may significantly improve gait for individuals with MS. Furthermore, gait parameters should be measured at both maximal and preferred speeds, with and without a cane, as its use may mask underlying gait impairment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)140-142
Number of pages3
JournalGait and Posture
Volume33
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2011
Externally publishedYes

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Canes
Gait
Multiple Sclerosis
Walking
Self-Help Devices
Masks
Population

Keywords

  • Assistive device
  • Gait
  • Multiple sclerosis
  • Spatiotemporal parameters

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Rehabilitation
  • Biophysics

Cite this

Gianfrancesco, M. A., Triche, E. W., Fawcett, J. A., Labas, M. P., Patterson, T. S., & Lo, A. C. (2011). Speed- and cane-related alterations in gait parameters in individuals with multiple sclerosis. Gait and Posture, 33(1), 140-142. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.gaitpost.2010.09.016

Speed- and cane-related alterations in gait parameters in individuals with multiple sclerosis. / Gianfrancesco, Milena A.; Triche, Elizabeth W.; Fawcett, Jennifer A.; Labas, Michele P.; Patterson, Tara S.; Lo, Albert C.

In: Gait and Posture, Vol. 33, No. 1, 01.2011, p. 140-142.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gianfrancesco, MA, Triche, EW, Fawcett, JA, Labas, MP, Patterson, TS & Lo, AC 2011, 'Speed- and cane-related alterations in gait parameters in individuals with multiple sclerosis', Gait and Posture, vol. 33, no. 1, pp. 140-142. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.gaitpost.2010.09.016
Gianfrancesco, Milena A. ; Triche, Elizabeth W. ; Fawcett, Jennifer A. ; Labas, Michele P. ; Patterson, Tara S. ; Lo, Albert C. / Speed- and cane-related alterations in gait parameters in individuals with multiple sclerosis. In: Gait and Posture. 2011 ; Vol. 33, No. 1. pp. 140-142.
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