Stability of alcohol use and teen dating violence for female youth

A latent transition analysis

Hye Jeong Choi, Jo Anna Elmquist, Ryan C. Shorey, Emily F. Rothman, Gregory L. Stuart, Jeffrey Temple

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction and Aims: Alcohol use is one of the most widely accepted and studied risk factors for teen dating violence (TDV). Too little research has explored longitudinally if it is true that an adolescent's alcohol use and TDV involvement simultaneously occur. In the current study, we examined whether there were latent status based on past-year TDV and alcohol use and whether female adolescents changed their statuses of TDV and alcohol use over time. Methods: The sample consisted of 583 female youths in seven public high schools in Texas. Three waves of longitudinal data collected from 2011 to 2013 were utilised in this study. Participants completed self-report assessments of alcohol use (past-year alcohol use, number of drinks in the past month and episodic heavy drinking within the past month) and psychological and physical TDV victimisation and perpetration. Latent transition analysis was used to examine if the latent status based on TDV and alcohol use changed over time. Results: Five separate latent statuses were identified: (i) no violence, no alcohol; (ii) alcohol; (iii) psychological violence, no alcohol; (iv) psychological violence, alcohol; and (v) physical and psychological violence, alcohol. Latent transition analysis indicated that adolescents generally remained in the same subgroup across time. Discussion: This study provides evidence on the co-occurrence of alcohol use and teen dating violence, and whether teens' status based on dating violence and alcohol use are stable over time. Findings from the current study highlight the importance of targeting both TDV and substance use in intervention and prevention programs. [Choi HJ, Elmquist J, Shorey RC, Rothman EF, Stuart GL,Temple JR. Stability of alcohol use and teen dating violence for female youth: Alatent transition analysis. Drug Alcohol Rev 2017;36:80–87].

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)80-87
Number of pages8
JournalDrug and Alcohol Review
Volume36
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2017
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

alcohol
Alcohols
violence
Violence
Psychology
Intimate Partner Violence
adolescent
Crime Victims
female adolescent
Self Report
Drinking
victimization
drug

Keywords

  • alcohol use
  • latent transition analysis
  • teen dating violence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Stability of alcohol use and teen dating violence for female youth : A latent transition analysis. / Choi, Hye Jeong; Elmquist, Jo Anna; Shorey, Ryan C.; Rothman, Emily F.; Stuart, Gregory L.; Temple, Jeffrey.

In: Drug and Alcohol Review, Vol. 36, No. 1, 01.01.2017, p. 80-87.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Choi, Hye Jeong ; Elmquist, Jo Anna ; Shorey, Ryan C. ; Rothman, Emily F. ; Stuart, Gregory L. ; Temple, Jeffrey. / Stability of alcohol use and teen dating violence for female youth : A latent transition analysis. In: Drug and Alcohol Review. 2017 ; Vol. 36, No. 1. pp. 80-87.
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