Steroid therapy can modulate gut barrier function, host defense, and survival in thermally injured mice

Luca Gianotti, J. Wesley Alexander, Ryoji Fukushima, Tonyia Eaves-Pyles

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

30 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Prednisone may be immunosuppressive and dehydroepiandrosterone may stimulate the immune response, but their effect on gut-origin sepsis caused by bacterial translocation has not been studied. Balb/c mice were treated orally with prednisone (1 or 10 mg/kg/day) or saline for 4 days before receiving gavage with 1010 14C-labeled Escherichia coli and a 20% thermal injury. Mice were transfused with allogeneic blood and given dehydroepiandrosterone (5 or 25 mg/kg/day) or vehicle subcutaneously for 4 days before bacterial garage and thermal injury. Some groups in each experiment were observed 10 days for mortality and others were sacrificed 4 hr postburn to measure translocation and survival of translocated bacteria. Survival in prednisone treated animals was 25% (10 mg/kg/day) and 75% (1 mg/kg/day) versus 80% for controls. Following dehydroepiandrosterone administration, survival was 72% (25 mg/kg/day/group) and 30% (5 mg/kg/day/group) versus 16% for controls. High dose prednisone increased bacterial translocation to the intestinal wall and mesenteric lymph nodes and greatly impaired killing of translocated E. coli. In contrast, dehydroepiandrosterone (25 mg/kg) did not affect translocation but significantly improved bacterial killing. Prednisone and dehydroepiandrosterone exert opposite effects during gut-derived sepsis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)53-58
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Surgical Research
Volume62
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1996
Externally publishedYes

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Dehydroepiandrosterone
Prednisone
Steroids
Bacterial Translocation
Sepsis
Hot Temperature
Escherichia coli
Therapeutics
Wounds and Injuries
Immunosuppressive Agents
Lymph Nodes
Bacteria
Mortality

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Steroid therapy can modulate gut barrier function, host defense, and survival in thermally injured mice. / Gianotti, Luca; Alexander, J. Wesley; Fukushima, Ryoji; Eaves-Pyles, Tonyia.

In: Journal of Surgical Research, Vol. 62, No. 1, 04.1996, p. 53-58.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Prednisone may be immunosuppressive and dehydroepiandrosterone may stimulate the immune response, but their effect on gut-origin sepsis caused by bacterial translocation has not been studied. Balb/c mice were treated orally with prednisone (1 or 10 mg/kg/day) or saline for 4 days before receiving gavage with 1010 14C-labeled Escherichia coli and a 20{\%} thermal injury. Mice were transfused with allogeneic blood and given dehydroepiandrosterone (5 or 25 mg/kg/day) or vehicle subcutaneously for 4 days before bacterial garage and thermal injury. Some groups in each experiment were observed 10 days for mortality and others were sacrificed 4 hr postburn to measure translocation and survival of translocated bacteria. Survival in prednisone treated animals was 25{\%} (10 mg/kg/day) and 75{\%} (1 mg/kg/day) versus 80{\%} for controls. Following dehydroepiandrosterone administration, survival was 72{\%} (25 mg/kg/day/group) and 30{\%} (5 mg/kg/day/group) versus 16{\%} for controls. High dose prednisone increased bacterial translocation to the intestinal wall and mesenteric lymph nodes and greatly impaired killing of translocated E. coli. In contrast, dehydroepiandrosterone (25 mg/kg) did not affect translocation but significantly improved bacterial killing. Prednisone and dehydroepiandrosterone exert opposite effects during gut-derived sepsis.",
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