Streptococcus faecium outbreak in a neonatal intensive care unit

P. E. Coudron, C. G. Mayhall, R. R. Facklam, A. C. Spadora, V. A. Lamb, M. R. Lybrand, H. P. Dalton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

An outbreak of bacteremia and meningitis in a neonatal intensive care unit is described. Seven cases occurred in premature infants with severe underlying diseases. An epidemiological investigation failed to document the reservoir of the epidemic strain but suggested that its transmission among the infants was via the hands of hospital personnel. All patients had nasogastric tubes and multiple intravascular devices. Conventional biotyping of isolates failed to differentiation between isolates from infected patients and isolates recovered from prevalence surveys and from the environment. However, rapid identification systems (API-20S [Analytab Products, Plainview, N.Y.] and the AutoMicrobic system [Vitek Systems, Inc., Hazelwood, Mo.]) were able to distinguish isolates recovered from infected patients and hands of hospital personnel from isolates recovered during prevalence and environmental surveys and 29 isolates from widespread geographical areas. This is the first known report of a nosocomial neonatal outbreak of bacteremia and meningitis due to Streptococcus faecium; it underscores the importance of identifying streptococci to species level.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1044-1048
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Clinical Microbiology
Volume20
Issue number6
StatePublished - 1984
Externally publishedYes

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Enterococcus faecium
Neonatal Intensive Care Units
Hospital Personnel
Disease Outbreaks
Bacteremia
Meningitis
Hand
Streptococcus
Premature Infants
Equipment and Supplies
Surveys and Questionnaires

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Microbiology

Cite this

Coudron, P. E., Mayhall, C. G., Facklam, R. R., Spadora, A. C., Lamb, V. A., Lybrand, M. R., & Dalton, H. P. (1984). Streptococcus faecium outbreak in a neonatal intensive care unit. Journal of Clinical Microbiology, 20(6), 1044-1048.

Streptococcus faecium outbreak in a neonatal intensive care unit. / Coudron, P. E.; Mayhall, C. G.; Facklam, R. R.; Spadora, A. C.; Lamb, V. A.; Lybrand, M. R.; Dalton, H. P.

In: Journal of Clinical Microbiology, Vol. 20, No. 6, 1984, p. 1044-1048.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Coudron, PE, Mayhall, CG, Facklam, RR, Spadora, AC, Lamb, VA, Lybrand, MR & Dalton, HP 1984, 'Streptococcus faecium outbreak in a neonatal intensive care unit', Journal of Clinical Microbiology, vol. 20, no. 6, pp. 1044-1048.
Coudron PE, Mayhall CG, Facklam RR, Spadora AC, Lamb VA, Lybrand MR et al. Streptococcus faecium outbreak in a neonatal intensive care unit. Journal of Clinical Microbiology. 1984;20(6):1044-1048.
Coudron, P. E. ; Mayhall, C. G. ; Facklam, R. R. ; Spadora, A. C. ; Lamb, V. A. ; Lybrand, M. R. ; Dalton, H. P. / Streptococcus faecium outbreak in a neonatal intensive care unit. In: Journal of Clinical Microbiology. 1984 ; Vol. 20, No. 6. pp. 1044-1048.
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