Stress, coping strategies, and depression - Uninsured primary care patients

Akiko Kamimura, Jeanie Ashby, Allison Jess, Alla Chernenko, Jennifer Tabler, Ha Ngoc Trinh, Maziar M. Nourian, Guadalupe Aguilera, Justine J. Reel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: People of low socio-economic status (SES) are particularly at risk for developing stress-related conditions. The purpose of this study is to examine depression, stress, and coping strategies among uninsured primary care patients who live below the 150th percentile of the federal poverty level. Specifically, this study compares the experiences of impoverished US-born English speakers, non-US-born English speakers, and Spanish speakers. Methods: Uninsured primary care patients utilizing a free clinic (N = 491) completed a self-administered survey using standardized measures of depression, perceived stress, and coping strategies in the spring of 2015. Results: US-born English speakers reported higher levels of depression and perceived stress compared to non- US-born English speakers and Spanish speakers. US-born English speakers are more likely to use negative coping strategies than non-US-born English speakers and Spanish speakers. Perceived stress and negative coping strategies are significant predictors of depression. Conclusion: US-born English speakers, non-US-born English speakers, and Spanish speakers reported different coping strategies, and therefore, may have different needs for addressing depression. In particular, USborn English speakers need interventions for reducing substance use and negative psychological coping strategies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)742-750
Number of pages9
JournalAmerican Journal of Health Behavior
Volume39
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2015
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

patient care
Primary Health Care
coping
Poverty
Economics
Psychology
poverty
economics
Surveys and Questionnaires
experience

Keywords

  • Coping
  • Depression
  • Low socio-economic status
  • Stress
  • Uninsured

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Health(social science)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Kamimura, A., Ashby, J., Jess, A., Chernenko, A., Tabler, J., Trinh, H. N., ... Reel, J. J. (2015). Stress, coping strategies, and depression - Uninsured primary care patients. American Journal of Health Behavior, 39(6), 742-750. https://doi.org/10.5993/AJHB.39.6.1

Stress, coping strategies, and depression - Uninsured primary care patients. / Kamimura, Akiko; Ashby, Jeanie; Jess, Allison; Chernenko, Alla; Tabler, Jennifer; Trinh, Ha Ngoc; Nourian, Maziar M.; Aguilera, Guadalupe; Reel, Justine J.

In: American Journal of Health Behavior, Vol. 39, No. 6, 01.11.2015, p. 742-750.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kamimura, A, Ashby, J, Jess, A, Chernenko, A, Tabler, J, Trinh, HN, Nourian, MM, Aguilera, G & Reel, JJ 2015, 'Stress, coping strategies, and depression - Uninsured primary care patients', American Journal of Health Behavior, vol. 39, no. 6, pp. 742-750. https://doi.org/10.5993/AJHB.39.6.1
Kamimura A, Ashby J, Jess A, Chernenko A, Tabler J, Trinh HN et al. Stress, coping strategies, and depression - Uninsured primary care patients. American Journal of Health Behavior. 2015 Nov 1;39(6):742-750. https://doi.org/10.5993/AJHB.39.6.1
Kamimura, Akiko ; Ashby, Jeanie ; Jess, Allison ; Chernenko, Alla ; Tabler, Jennifer ; Trinh, Ha Ngoc ; Nourian, Maziar M. ; Aguilera, Guadalupe ; Reel, Justine J. / Stress, coping strategies, and depression - Uninsured primary care patients. In: American Journal of Health Behavior. 2015 ; Vol. 39, No. 6. pp. 742-750.
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