Student response to reports of unprofessional behavior

assessing risk of subsequent professional problems in medical school

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

BACKGROUND: An early concern note (ECN) program is used by some medical schools to identify, counsel, and intervene when students exhibit unprofessional behavior. Student maturity, insight, propensity for reflection, and receptiveness to feedback have been suggested as predictors of future behavior. OBJECTIVE: We hypothesized that (a) classifying students with a first ECN based on their response to the report would identify students at risk of repeat ECNs better than the action that prompted it and (b) receipt of multiple ECNs would identify students at risk of adverse academic events. DESIGN: For this study, 459 ECNs were classified based on students' (1) recognition that their behavior was inappropriate and (2) acceptance of responsibility for the behavior. Student academic progress and receipt of subsequent ECNs were tracked. RESULTS: Students who recognized their behavior was inappropriate and accepted responsibility after an initial ECN received subsequent ECNs at lower rates (14-19%) than students who disagreed with the significance of their behavior or were resistant to accepting responsibility (36-59%). Students with limited insight and adaptability appeared to be at highest risk. Seventy-one percent of students with three or more ECNs encountered adverse academic events during enrollment. CONCLUSION: Student reactions to reports of unprofessional behavior may be useful as a tool to help assess risk of recurrent lapses. Students with diminished capacity to recognize behaviors as unprofessional or accept responsibility for them appear to be at highest risk for additional adverse academic and professionalism events while in medical school.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Number of pages1
JournalMedical Education Online
Volume23
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2018

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risk behavior
school
student
responsibility
event
maturity
acceptance

Keywords

  • academic risk
  • early concern note
  • learning environment
  • medical students
  • Professionalism

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education

Cite this

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title = "Student response to reports of unprofessional behavior: assessing risk of subsequent professional problems in medical school",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: An early concern note (ECN) program is used by some medical schools to identify, counsel, and intervene when students exhibit unprofessional behavior. Student maturity, insight, propensity for reflection, and receptiveness to feedback have been suggested as predictors of future behavior. OBJECTIVE: We hypothesized that (a) classifying students with a first ECN based on their response to the report would identify students at risk of repeat ECNs better than the action that prompted it and (b) receipt of multiple ECNs would identify students at risk of adverse academic events. DESIGN: For this study, 459 ECNs were classified based on students' (1) recognition that their behavior was inappropriate and (2) acceptance of responsibility for the behavior. Student academic progress and receipt of subsequent ECNs were tracked. RESULTS: Students who recognized their behavior was inappropriate and accepted responsibility after an initial ECN received subsequent ECNs at lower rates (14-19{\%}) than students who disagreed with the significance of their behavior or were resistant to accepting responsibility (36-59{\%}). Students with limited insight and adaptability appeared to be at highest risk. Seventy-one percent of students with three or more ECNs encountered adverse academic events during enrollment. CONCLUSION: Student reactions to reports of unprofessional behavior may be useful as a tool to help assess risk of recurrent lapses. Students with diminished capacity to recognize behaviors as unprofessional or accept responsibility for them appear to be at highest risk for additional adverse academic and professionalism events while in medical school.",
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N2 - BACKGROUND: An early concern note (ECN) program is used by some medical schools to identify, counsel, and intervene when students exhibit unprofessional behavior. Student maturity, insight, propensity for reflection, and receptiveness to feedback have been suggested as predictors of future behavior. OBJECTIVE: We hypothesized that (a) classifying students with a first ECN based on their response to the report would identify students at risk of repeat ECNs better than the action that prompted it and (b) receipt of multiple ECNs would identify students at risk of adverse academic events. DESIGN: For this study, 459 ECNs were classified based on students' (1) recognition that their behavior was inappropriate and (2) acceptance of responsibility for the behavior. Student academic progress and receipt of subsequent ECNs were tracked. RESULTS: Students who recognized their behavior was inappropriate and accepted responsibility after an initial ECN received subsequent ECNs at lower rates (14-19%) than students who disagreed with the significance of their behavior or were resistant to accepting responsibility (36-59%). Students with limited insight and adaptability appeared to be at highest risk. Seventy-one percent of students with three or more ECNs encountered adverse academic events during enrollment. CONCLUSION: Student reactions to reports of unprofessional behavior may be useful as a tool to help assess risk of recurrent lapses. Students with diminished capacity to recognize behaviors as unprofessional or accept responsibility for them appear to be at highest risk for additional adverse academic and professionalism events while in medical school.

AB - BACKGROUND: An early concern note (ECN) program is used by some medical schools to identify, counsel, and intervene when students exhibit unprofessional behavior. Student maturity, insight, propensity for reflection, and receptiveness to feedback have been suggested as predictors of future behavior. OBJECTIVE: We hypothesized that (a) classifying students with a first ECN based on their response to the report would identify students at risk of repeat ECNs better than the action that prompted it and (b) receipt of multiple ECNs would identify students at risk of adverse academic events. DESIGN: For this study, 459 ECNs were classified based on students' (1) recognition that their behavior was inappropriate and (2) acceptance of responsibility for the behavior. Student academic progress and receipt of subsequent ECNs were tracked. RESULTS: Students who recognized their behavior was inappropriate and accepted responsibility after an initial ECN received subsequent ECNs at lower rates (14-19%) than students who disagreed with the significance of their behavior or were resistant to accepting responsibility (36-59%). Students with limited insight and adaptability appeared to be at highest risk. Seventy-one percent of students with three or more ECNs encountered adverse academic events during enrollment. CONCLUSION: Student reactions to reports of unprofessional behavior may be useful as a tool to help assess risk of recurrent lapses. Students with diminished capacity to recognize behaviors as unprofessional or accept responsibility for them appear to be at highest risk for additional adverse academic and professionalism events while in medical school.

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