Substrate metabolism during different exercise intensities in endurance- trained women

J. A. Romijn, E. F. Coyle, L. S. Sidossis, J. Rosenblatt, R. R. Wolfe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

176 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We have studied eight endurance-trained women at rest and during exercise at 25, 65, and 85% of maximal oxygen uptake. The rate of appearance (R(a)) of free fatty acids (FFA) was determined by infusion of [2H2] palmitate, and fat oxidation rates were determined by indirect calorimetry. Glucose kinetics were assessed with [6,6-2H2] glucose, Glucose R(a) increased in relation to exercise intensity. In contrast, whereas FFA R(a) was significantly increased to the same extent in low- and moderate-intensity exercise, during high-intensity exercise, FFA R(a) was reduced compared with the other exercise values. Carbohydrates oxidation increased progressively with exercise intensity, whereas the highest rate of fat oxidation was during exercise at 65% of maximal oxygen uptake. After correction for differences in lean body mass, there were no differences between these results and previously reported data in endurance-trained men studied under the same conditions, except for slight differences in glucose metabolism during low- intensity exercise (Romijn JA, Coyle EF, Sidossis LS, Gastaldeli A, Horowitz JF, Endert E, and Wolfe RR. Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab 265: E380-E391, 1993). We conclude that the patterns of changes in substrate kinetics during moderate- and high-intensity exercise are similar in trained men and women.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1707-1714
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Applied Physiology
Volume88
Issue number5
StatePublished - May 2000

Fingerprint

Exercise
Nonesterified Fatty Acids
Glucose
Fats
Oxygen
Indirect Calorimetry
Palmitates
Carbohydrates

Keywords

  • Body composition
  • Fatty acids
  • Glucose
  • Glycogen
  • Stable isotopes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Endocrinology
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

Cite this

Romijn, J. A., Coyle, E. F., Sidossis, L. S., Rosenblatt, J., & Wolfe, R. R. (2000). Substrate metabolism during different exercise intensities in endurance- trained women. Journal of Applied Physiology, 88(5), 1707-1714.

Substrate metabolism during different exercise intensities in endurance- trained women. / Romijn, J. A.; Coyle, E. F.; Sidossis, L. S.; Rosenblatt, J.; Wolfe, R. R.

In: Journal of Applied Physiology, Vol. 88, No. 5, 05.2000, p. 1707-1714.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Romijn, JA, Coyle, EF, Sidossis, LS, Rosenblatt, J & Wolfe, RR 2000, 'Substrate metabolism during different exercise intensities in endurance- trained women', Journal of Applied Physiology, vol. 88, no. 5, pp. 1707-1714.
Romijn JA, Coyle EF, Sidossis LS, Rosenblatt J, Wolfe RR. Substrate metabolism during different exercise intensities in endurance- trained women. Journal of Applied Physiology. 2000 May;88(5):1707-1714.
Romijn, J. A. ; Coyle, E. F. ; Sidossis, L. S. ; Rosenblatt, J. ; Wolfe, R. R. / Substrate metabolism during different exercise intensities in endurance- trained women. In: Journal of Applied Physiology. 2000 ; Vol. 88, No. 5. pp. 1707-1714.
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