Sulfur amino acid metabolism in the developing rhesus monkey brain: Interrelationship of taurine and glutamate

David K. Rassin, John A. Sturman, Gerald E. Gaull

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

The relationship of taurine to glutamate, and to other amino acids, has been examined in the occipital lobe of the developing rhesus monkey. During development taurine decreases in concentration (4.96 μmol/g in fetus to 1.52 μmol/g in adult) while glutamate increases (7.92 μmol/g in fetus to 11.26 μmol/g in adult). When the concentration of taurine is plotted against that of glutamate in fetal, neonatal and adult animals there is a significant correlation in the fetal (p<0.01) and adult (p<0.01) but not in the neonatal occipital lobe samples. This correlation in both fetal and adult brain is specific for these two amino acids. Subcellular fractionation studies further indicate that this relationship may be of special importance in nerve endings.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1107-1118
Number of pages12
JournalNeurochemical Research
Volume7
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 1982

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Sulfur amino acid metabolism in the developing rhesus monkey brain: Interrelationship of taurine and glutamate'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this