Suppression of acute and chronic inflammation by dietary gamma linolenic acid

G. Tate, B. F. Mandell, Michael Laposata, D. Ohliger, D. G. Baker, H. R. Schumacher, R. B. Zurier

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

63 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We examined the effect of diets enriched in gamma linolenic acid (GLA) on acute inflammation induced by monosodium urate crystals, and on subacute and chronic inflammation induced by complete Freund's adjuvant in the rat subcutaneous air pouch and in rats with adjuvant induced arthritis. Diets were enriched (15% fat) with borage seed oil (23% GLA) or safflower oil (<1% GLA). Diets enriched with GLA suppressed inflammation markedly in all models, whereas the safflower oil diet did not influence the inflammatory response. The degree of inflammation was quantified by measuring pouch exudate cell concentration, lysosomal enzyme activity, volume, protein concentration and prostaglandin E2 and leukotriene B4 concentrations. In the chronic air pouch model, the pouch lining was thickened, invaded by mononuclear cells and exhibited proliferation of lining cells 14 days after adjuvant injection. The lesion was far less severe and usual pouch lining architecture was maintained in animals given dietary GLA. Livers of rats fed borage seed oil were enriched in GLA and dihomo gamma linolenic acid (DGLA), and the DGLA/arachidonate ratio was increased 5-fold compared with animals fed safflower oil. Enrichment of diet with plant seed oils rich in GLA may provide a way to alter generation of prostaglandins and leukotrienes and to influence acute and chronic inflammatory responses.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)729-733
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Rheumatology
Volume16
Issue number6
StatePublished - 1989
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

gamma-Linolenic Acid
Inflammation
Safflower Oil
Diet
8,11,14-Eicosatrienoic Acid
Seeds
Air
Experimental Arthritis
Leukotriene B4
Plant Oils
Freund's Adjuvant
Leukotrienes
Exudates and Transudates
Uric Acid
Dinoprostone
Prostaglandins
Fats
Cell Proliferation
Injections
Liver

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • Rheumatology

Cite this

Tate, G., Mandell, B. F., Laposata, M., Ohliger, D., Baker, D. G., Schumacher, H. R., & Zurier, R. B. (1989). Suppression of acute and chronic inflammation by dietary gamma linolenic acid. Journal of Rheumatology, 16(6), 729-733.

Suppression of acute and chronic inflammation by dietary gamma linolenic acid. / Tate, G.; Mandell, B. F.; Laposata, Michael; Ohliger, D.; Baker, D. G.; Schumacher, H. R.; Zurier, R. B.

In: Journal of Rheumatology, Vol. 16, No. 6, 1989, p. 729-733.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Tate, G, Mandell, BF, Laposata, M, Ohliger, D, Baker, DG, Schumacher, HR & Zurier, RB 1989, 'Suppression of acute and chronic inflammation by dietary gamma linolenic acid', Journal of Rheumatology, vol. 16, no. 6, pp. 729-733.
Tate G, Mandell BF, Laposata M, Ohliger D, Baker DG, Schumacher HR et al. Suppression of acute and chronic inflammation by dietary gamma linolenic acid. Journal of Rheumatology. 1989;16(6):729-733.
Tate, G. ; Mandell, B. F. ; Laposata, Michael ; Ohliger, D. ; Baker, D. G. ; Schumacher, H. R. ; Zurier, R. B. / Suppression of acute and chronic inflammation by dietary gamma linolenic acid. In: Journal of Rheumatology. 1989 ; Vol. 16, No. 6. pp. 729-733.
@article{91fce6e733de4f75a5864d65cd8746a7,
title = "Suppression of acute and chronic inflammation by dietary gamma linolenic acid",
abstract = "We examined the effect of diets enriched in gamma linolenic acid (GLA) on acute inflammation induced by monosodium urate crystals, and on subacute and chronic inflammation induced by complete Freund's adjuvant in the rat subcutaneous air pouch and in rats with adjuvant induced arthritis. Diets were enriched (15{\%} fat) with borage seed oil (23{\%} GLA) or safflower oil (<1{\%} GLA). Diets enriched with GLA suppressed inflammation markedly in all models, whereas the safflower oil diet did not influence the inflammatory response. The degree of inflammation was quantified by measuring pouch exudate cell concentration, lysosomal enzyme activity, volume, protein concentration and prostaglandin E2 and leukotriene B4 concentrations. In the chronic air pouch model, the pouch lining was thickened, invaded by mononuclear cells and exhibited proliferation of lining cells 14 days after adjuvant injection. The lesion was far less severe and usual pouch lining architecture was maintained in animals given dietary GLA. Livers of rats fed borage seed oil were enriched in GLA and dihomo gamma linolenic acid (DGLA), and the DGLA/arachidonate ratio was increased 5-fold compared with animals fed safflower oil. Enrichment of diet with plant seed oils rich in GLA may provide a way to alter generation of prostaglandins and leukotrienes and to influence acute and chronic inflammatory responses.",
author = "G. Tate and Mandell, {B. F.} and Michael Laposata and D. Ohliger and Baker, {D. G.} and Schumacher, {H. R.} and Zurier, {R. B.}",
year = "1989",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "16",
pages = "729--733",
journal = "Journal of Rheumatology",
issn = "0315-162X",
publisher = "Journal of Rheumatology",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Suppression of acute and chronic inflammation by dietary gamma linolenic acid

AU - Tate, G.

AU - Mandell, B. F.

AU - Laposata, Michael

AU - Ohliger, D.

AU - Baker, D. G.

AU - Schumacher, H. R.

AU - Zurier, R. B.

PY - 1989

Y1 - 1989

N2 - We examined the effect of diets enriched in gamma linolenic acid (GLA) on acute inflammation induced by monosodium urate crystals, and on subacute and chronic inflammation induced by complete Freund's adjuvant in the rat subcutaneous air pouch and in rats with adjuvant induced arthritis. Diets were enriched (15% fat) with borage seed oil (23% GLA) or safflower oil (<1% GLA). Diets enriched with GLA suppressed inflammation markedly in all models, whereas the safflower oil diet did not influence the inflammatory response. The degree of inflammation was quantified by measuring pouch exudate cell concentration, lysosomal enzyme activity, volume, protein concentration and prostaglandin E2 and leukotriene B4 concentrations. In the chronic air pouch model, the pouch lining was thickened, invaded by mononuclear cells and exhibited proliferation of lining cells 14 days after adjuvant injection. The lesion was far less severe and usual pouch lining architecture was maintained in animals given dietary GLA. Livers of rats fed borage seed oil were enriched in GLA and dihomo gamma linolenic acid (DGLA), and the DGLA/arachidonate ratio was increased 5-fold compared with animals fed safflower oil. Enrichment of diet with plant seed oils rich in GLA may provide a way to alter generation of prostaglandins and leukotrienes and to influence acute and chronic inflammatory responses.

AB - We examined the effect of diets enriched in gamma linolenic acid (GLA) on acute inflammation induced by monosodium urate crystals, and on subacute and chronic inflammation induced by complete Freund's adjuvant in the rat subcutaneous air pouch and in rats with adjuvant induced arthritis. Diets were enriched (15% fat) with borage seed oil (23% GLA) or safflower oil (<1% GLA). Diets enriched with GLA suppressed inflammation markedly in all models, whereas the safflower oil diet did not influence the inflammatory response. The degree of inflammation was quantified by measuring pouch exudate cell concentration, lysosomal enzyme activity, volume, protein concentration and prostaglandin E2 and leukotriene B4 concentrations. In the chronic air pouch model, the pouch lining was thickened, invaded by mononuclear cells and exhibited proliferation of lining cells 14 days after adjuvant injection. The lesion was far less severe and usual pouch lining architecture was maintained in animals given dietary GLA. Livers of rats fed borage seed oil were enriched in GLA and dihomo gamma linolenic acid (DGLA), and the DGLA/arachidonate ratio was increased 5-fold compared with animals fed safflower oil. Enrichment of diet with plant seed oils rich in GLA may provide a way to alter generation of prostaglandins and leukotrienes and to influence acute and chronic inflammatory responses.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0024365182&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0024365182&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 16

SP - 729

EP - 733

JO - Journal of Rheumatology

JF - Journal of Rheumatology

SN - 0315-162X

IS - 6

ER -