Suppression of the radiation-induced expression of a tumor-associated antigen in human cell hybrids by the protease inhibitor antipain

C. Sun, M. Colman, J. L. Redpath

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The effect of the protease inhibitor antipain (1.25 μg/ml) on the radiation-induced expression of a tumor-associated antigen in human cell hybrids has been investigated. A variety of treatment protocols have been studied where antipain was present before, during and at various times post-irradiation. It was found that antipain suppressed the radiation-induced expression of the tumor-associated antigen in all treatment protocols. The most effective suppression was obtained in those protocols where the protease inhibitor was present for the first 4 h post-irradiation. A possible explanation for this observation is that antipain may inhibit an error-prone DNA repair process. However, it is clear that this is not the only mechanism whereby the inhibitor can exert its effect since suppression was obtained even when antipain was added 10 days post-irradiation, a time when any DNA repair processes would be expected to be over.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2333-2335
Number of pages3
JournalCarcinogenesis
Volume9
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1988
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Antipain
Hybrid Cells
Protease
Neoplasm Antigens
Antigens
Protease Inhibitors
Irradiation
Inhibitor
Tumors
Tumor
Radiation
Cells
Repair
Cell
DNA
Clinical Protocols
DNA Repair
Human
Peptide Hydrolases

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Statistics, Probability and Uncertainty
  • Applied Mathematics
  • Physiology (medical)
  • Physiology
  • Behavioral Neuroscience
  • Cancer Research

Cite this

Suppression of the radiation-induced expression of a tumor-associated antigen in human cell hybrids by the protease inhibitor antipain. / Sun, C.; Colman, M.; Redpath, J. L.

In: Carcinogenesis, Vol. 9, No. 12, 12.1988, p. 2333-2335.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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