Suprathreshold heat pain response predicts activity-related pain, but not rest-related pain, in an exercise-induced injury model

Rogelio A. Coronado, Corey B. Simon, Carolina Valencia, Jeffrey J. Parr, Paul A. Borsa, Steven Z. George

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Exercise-induced injury models are advantageous for studying pain since the onset of pain is controlled and both pre-injury and post-injury factors can be utilized as explanatory variables or predictors. In these studies, rest-related pain is often considered the primary dependent variable or outcome, as opposed to a measure of activity-related pain. Additionally, few studies include pain sensitivity measures as predictors. In this study, we examined the influence of pre-injury and post-injury factors, including pain sensitivity, for induced rest and activity-related pain following exercise induced muscle injury. The overall goal of this investigation was to determine if there were convergent or divergent predictors of rest and activityrelated pain. One hundred forty-three participants provided demographic, psychological, and pain sensitivity information and underwent a standard fatigue trial of resistance exercise to induce injury of the dominant shoulder. Pain at rest and during active and resisted shoulder motion were measured at 48- and 96-hours post-injury. Separate hierarchical models were generated for assessing the influence of pre-injury and post-injury factors on 48- and 96-hour rest-related and activityrelated pain. Overall, we did not find a universal predictor of pain across all models. However, pre-injury and post-injury suprathreshold heat pain response (SHPR), a pain sensitivity measure, was a consistent predictor of activity-related pain, even after controlling for known psychological factors. These results suggest there is differential prediction of pain. A measure of pain sensitivity such as SHPR appears more influential for activity-related pain, but not rest-related pain, and may reflect different underlying processes involved during pain appraisal.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere108699
JournalPLoS One
Volume9
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

pain
exercise
Hot Temperature
heat
Pain
Wounds and Injuries
Muscle
Fatigue of materials
shoulders
heat injury
Psychology
strength training
psychosocial factors
economic valuation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Cite this

Suprathreshold heat pain response predicts activity-related pain, but not rest-related pain, in an exercise-induced injury model. / Coronado, Rogelio A.; Simon, Corey B.; Valencia, Carolina; Parr, Jeffrey J.; Borsa, Paul A.; George, Steven Z.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 9, No. 9, e108699, 2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Coronado, Rogelio A. ; Simon, Corey B. ; Valencia, Carolina ; Parr, Jeffrey J. ; Borsa, Paul A. ; George, Steven Z. / Suprathreshold heat pain response predicts activity-related pain, but not rest-related pain, in an exercise-induced injury model. In: PLoS One. 2014 ; Vol. 9, No. 9.
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