Susceptibility to human immunodeficiency virus-1 infection of human foreskin and cervical tissue grown in explant culture

Bruce K. Patterson, Alan Landay, Joan N. Siegel, Zareefa Flener, Dennis Pessis, Antonio Chaviano, Robert C. Bailey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

237 Scopus citations

Abstract

Numerous studies have indicated a protective effect of male circumcision against acquisition of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1. We investigated mechanisms responsible for the possible increased HIV-1 susceptibility of human foreskin. Foreskins from eight pediatric and six adult patients with (n = 3) and without (n = 11) histories of sexually transmitted disease were evaluated. Six cervical biopsies from HIV-1-seronegative women were included as controls. CD4+ T cells, macrophages, and Langerhans' cells (LCs) were quantified using image analysis. Cells expressing HIV-1co-receptors CCR5 and CXCR4 were quantified using immunofluorescence and image analysis. Foreskin biopsies were infected ex vivo in organotypic culture with HIV-1. HIV-1 DNA copies in foreskin and cervical mucosal tissue werecompared and the infected cell phenotype was determined. Foreskin mucosa contained higher mean proportions of CD4+ T cells (22.4%), macrophages (2.4%), and LCs (11.5%) in adults than in children (4.9%, 0.3%, and 6.2%, respectively) or in cervical mucosa (6.2%, 1.4%, and 1.5%, respectively). The highest proportions of CD4+ T cells and LCs occurred in patients with a history of infection. Foreskin immune cells expressed predominantly the CCR5 HIV-1 co-receptor. Adult foreskin mucosa had greater susceptibility to infection with HIVbal than cervical mucosa or the external surface of foreskin tissue. Circumcision likely reduces risk of HIV-1 acquisition in men by decreasing HIV-1 target cells i.e.,

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)867-873
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Journal of Pathology
Volume161
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2002
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine

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