Targets of polyamine dysregulation in major depression and suicide: Activity-dependent feedback, excitability, and neurotransmission

Agenor Limon-Ruiz, Firoza Mamdani, Brooke E. Hjelm, Marquis P. Vawter, Adolfo Sequeira

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a leading cause of disability worldwide characterized by altered neuronal activity in brain regions involved in the control of stress and emotion. Although multiple lines of evidence suggest that altered stress-coping mechanisms underlie the etiology of MDD, the homeostatic control of neuronal excitability in MDD at the molecular level is not well established. In this review, we examine past and current evidence implicating dysregulation of the polyamine system as a central factor in the homeostatic response to stress and the etiology of MDD. We discuss the cellular effects of abnormal metabolism of polyamines in the context of their role in sensing and modulation of neuronal, electrical, and synaptic activity. Finally, we discuss evidence supporting an allostatic model of depression based on a chronic elevation in polyamine levels resulting in self-sustained stress response mechanisms maintained by maladaptive homeostatic mechanisms.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)80-91
Number of pages12
JournalNeuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews
Volume66
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2016
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Major Depressive Disorder
Polyamines
Synaptic Transmission
Suicide
Depression
Emotions
Brain

Keywords

  • Excitability
  • Homeostasis
  • Ion channels
  • Major depression
  • Neurotransmitter receptors
  • Polyamine system
  • Suicide

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

Cite this

Targets of polyamine dysregulation in major depression and suicide : Activity-dependent feedback, excitability, and neurotransmission. / Limon-Ruiz, Agenor; Mamdani, Firoza; Hjelm, Brooke E.; Vawter, Marquis P.; Sequeira, Adolfo.

In: Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews, Vol. 66, 01.07.2016, p. 80-91.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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