Technique of controlled reperfusion of the transplanted lung in humans

Scott D. Lick, Paul S. Brown, Mark Kurusz, Roger A. Vertrees, Christopher McQuitty, William E. Johnston

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

36 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background. Reperfusion injury remains a significant and sometimes fatal problem in clinical lung transplantation. Controlled reperfusion of the transplanted lung using white cell-filtered, nutrient-enriched blood has been shown recently to significantly ameliorate reperfusion damage in a porcine model. We modified this experimental technique and applied it to human lung transplantation. Methods. Approximately 1,500 mL of arterial blood was slowly collected in a cardiotomy reservoir during the lung implant, and mixed to make a 4:1 solution of blood: modified Buckberg perfusate. This solution was passed through a leukocyte filter and into the transplant pulmonary artery for 10 minutes, at a controlled rate (200 mL/min) and pressure (less than 20 mm Hg), immediately before removal of the vascular clamp. Results. Five patients underwent lung transplantation (1 bilateral, 4 single lung) using this technique. All patients were ventilated on a 40% fraction of inspired oxygen within a few hours and extubated on or before the first postoperative day. Conclusions. Controlled reperfusion of the transplanted lung with white cell-filtered, nutrient-enriched blood has given excellent functional results in our small initial clinical series. (C) 2000 by The Society of Thoracic Surgeons.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)910-912
Number of pages3
JournalAnnals of Thoracic Surgery
Volume69
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2000

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Reperfusion
Lung Transplantation
Lung
Reperfusion Injury
Food
Pulmonary Artery
Blood Vessels
Leukocytes
Swine
Oxygen
Transplants
Pressure

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Surgery

Cite this

Technique of controlled reperfusion of the transplanted lung in humans. / Lick, Scott D.; Brown, Paul S.; Kurusz, Mark; Vertrees, Roger A.; McQuitty, Christopher; Johnston, William E.

In: Annals of Thoracic Surgery, Vol. 69, No. 3, 03.2000, p. 910-912.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lick, Scott D. ; Brown, Paul S. ; Kurusz, Mark ; Vertrees, Roger A. ; McQuitty, Christopher ; Johnston, William E. / Technique of controlled reperfusion of the transplanted lung in humans. In: Annals of Thoracic Surgery. 2000 ; Vol. 69, No. 3. pp. 910-912.
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