Teen sexting and its association with sexual behaviors

Jeffrey Temple, Jonathan A. Paul, Patricia Van Den Berg, Vi Donna Le, Amy McElhany, Brian W. Temple

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

144 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To examine the prevalence of sexting behaviors as well as their relation to dating, sex, and risky sexual behaviors using a large school-based sample of adolescents. Design: Data are from time 2 of a 3-year longitudinal study. Participants self-reported their history of dating, sexual behaviors, and sexting (sent, asked, been asked, and/or bothered by being asked to send nude photographs of themselves). Setting: Seven public high schools in southeast Texas. Participants: A total of 948 public high school students (55.9% female) participated. The sample consisted of African American (26.6%), white (30.3%), Hispanic (31.7%), Asian (3.4%), and mixed/other (8.0%) teens. Main Outcome Measure: Having ever engaged in sexting behaviors. Results: Twenty-eight percent of the sample reported having sent a naked picture of themselves through text or e-mail (sext), and 31% reported having asked someone for a sext. More than half (57%) had been asked to send a sext, with most being bothered by having been asked. Adolescents who engaged in sexting behaviors were more likely to have begun dating and to have had sex than those who did not sext (all P < .001). For girls, sexting was also associated with risky sexual behaviors. Conclusions: The results suggest that teen sexting is prevalent and potentially indicative of teens' sexual behaviors. Teen-focused health care providers should consider screening for sexting behaviors to provide age-specific education about the potential consequences of sexting and as a mechanism for discussing sexual behaviors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)828-833
Number of pages6
JournalArchives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine
Volume166
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2012

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Sexual Behavior
Postal Service
Hispanic Americans
African Americans
Health Personnel
Longitudinal Studies
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Students
Education

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Teen sexting and its association with sexual behaviors. / Temple, Jeffrey; Paul, Jonathan A.; Van Den Berg, Patricia; Le, Vi Donna; McElhany, Amy; Temple, Brian W.

In: Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, Vol. 166, No. 9, 09.2012, p. 828-833.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Temple, J, Paul, JA, Van Den Berg, P, Le, VD, McElhany, A & Temple, BW 2012, 'Teen sexting and its association with sexual behaviors', Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, vol. 166, no. 9, pp. 828-833. https://doi.org/10.1001/archpediatrics.2012.835
Temple, Jeffrey ; Paul, Jonathan A. ; Van Den Berg, Patricia ; Le, Vi Donna ; McElhany, Amy ; Temple, Brian W. / Teen sexting and its association with sexual behaviors. In: Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine. 2012 ; Vol. 166, No. 9. pp. 828-833.
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