Telephone triage: Results of adolescent clinic responses to a mock patient with pelvic pain

Richard Rupp, Keith P. Ramsey, John D. Foley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the appropriateness of telephone advice given by adolescent clinics. Methods: Using a mock scenario simulated by a teenage actress, adolescent clinics nationwide were telephoned by a 16-year-old female complaining of acute onset of "belly pain" in her left lower side. Upon questioning the mock patient, clinics were able to obtain further information. In short, it could be determined that the mock patient was sexually active, did not use contraception, was "late" for her period, and had just begun spotting. With the information available, a potentially life-threatening ectopic pregnancy could not be ruled out. Telephone triage of 35 clinics was evaluated according to the final disposition. Appropriate advice included arranging to see the patient that day or referring the patient to another facility (i.e., emergency department) to be seen that day. Results: Sixty-three percent of the clinics gave appropriate advice; 37% gave inappropriate advice. Nonprofessional personnel rendered the advice in over 60% of the calls. Conclusion: This study suggests a need to reevaluate the procedures utilized to provide proper telephone advice to adolescents.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)249-253
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Adolescent Health
Volume15
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1994
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Pelvic Pain
Triage
Telephone
Metrorrhagia
Ectopic Pregnancy
Contraception
Hospital Emergency Service
Pain

Keywords

  • Telephone triage Adolescent clinic

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Telephone triage : Results of adolescent clinic responses to a mock patient with pelvic pain. / Rupp, Richard; Ramsey, Keith P.; Foley, John D.

In: Journal of Adolescent Health, Vol. 15, No. 3, 1994, p. 249-253.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{f48315e34a6e43f29df8fde018f22025,
title = "Telephone triage: Results of adolescent clinic responses to a mock patient with pelvic pain",
abstract = "Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the appropriateness of telephone advice given by adolescent clinics. Methods: Using a mock scenario simulated by a teenage actress, adolescent clinics nationwide were telephoned by a 16-year-old female complaining of acute onset of {"}belly pain{"} in her left lower side. Upon questioning the mock patient, clinics were able to obtain further information. In short, it could be determined that the mock patient was sexually active, did not use contraception, was {"}late{"} for her period, and had just begun spotting. With the information available, a potentially life-threatening ectopic pregnancy could not be ruled out. Telephone triage of 35 clinics was evaluated according to the final disposition. Appropriate advice included arranging to see the patient that day or referring the patient to another facility (i.e., emergency department) to be seen that day. Results: Sixty-three percent of the clinics gave appropriate advice; 37{\%} gave inappropriate advice. Nonprofessional personnel rendered the advice in over 60{\%} of the calls. Conclusion: This study suggests a need to reevaluate the procedures utilized to provide proper telephone advice to adolescents.",
keywords = "Telephone triage Adolescent clinic",
author = "Richard Rupp and Ramsey, {Keith P.} and Foley, {John D.}",
year = "1994",
doi = "10.1016/1054-139X(94)90511-8",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "15",
pages = "249--253",
journal = "Journal of Adolescent Health",
issn = "1054-139X",
publisher = "Elsevier USA",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Telephone triage

T2 - Results of adolescent clinic responses to a mock patient with pelvic pain

AU - Rupp, Richard

AU - Ramsey, Keith P.

AU - Foley, John D.

PY - 1994

Y1 - 1994

N2 - Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the appropriateness of telephone advice given by adolescent clinics. Methods: Using a mock scenario simulated by a teenage actress, adolescent clinics nationwide were telephoned by a 16-year-old female complaining of acute onset of "belly pain" in her left lower side. Upon questioning the mock patient, clinics were able to obtain further information. In short, it could be determined that the mock patient was sexually active, did not use contraception, was "late" for her period, and had just begun spotting. With the information available, a potentially life-threatening ectopic pregnancy could not be ruled out. Telephone triage of 35 clinics was evaluated according to the final disposition. Appropriate advice included arranging to see the patient that day or referring the patient to another facility (i.e., emergency department) to be seen that day. Results: Sixty-three percent of the clinics gave appropriate advice; 37% gave inappropriate advice. Nonprofessional personnel rendered the advice in over 60% of the calls. Conclusion: This study suggests a need to reevaluate the procedures utilized to provide proper telephone advice to adolescents.

AB - Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the appropriateness of telephone advice given by adolescent clinics. Methods: Using a mock scenario simulated by a teenage actress, adolescent clinics nationwide were telephoned by a 16-year-old female complaining of acute onset of "belly pain" in her left lower side. Upon questioning the mock patient, clinics were able to obtain further information. In short, it could be determined that the mock patient was sexually active, did not use contraception, was "late" for her period, and had just begun spotting. With the information available, a potentially life-threatening ectopic pregnancy could not be ruled out. Telephone triage of 35 clinics was evaluated according to the final disposition. Appropriate advice included arranging to see the patient that day or referring the patient to another facility (i.e., emergency department) to be seen that day. Results: Sixty-three percent of the clinics gave appropriate advice; 37% gave inappropriate advice. Nonprofessional personnel rendered the advice in over 60% of the calls. Conclusion: This study suggests a need to reevaluate the procedures utilized to provide proper telephone advice to adolescents.

KW - Telephone triage Adolescent clinic

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0028332176&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0028332176&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/1054-139X(94)90511-8

DO - 10.1016/1054-139X(94)90511-8

M3 - Article

C2 - 8075096

AN - SCOPUS:0028332176

VL - 15

SP - 249

EP - 253

JO - Journal of Adolescent Health

JF - Journal of Adolescent Health

SN - 1054-139X

IS - 3

ER -