The 1995 Clinical Research Award

Younger pediatric patients with burns are at risk for continuing postdischarge weight loss

B. Mittendorfer, M. A. Hildreth, M. H. Desai, David Herndon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Pediatric patients with severe burns exhibit growth delays. This study investigates weight history after discharge. Twenty-seven children with burns covering more than 40% of their total body surface area were studied from admission until 2 to 4 years after injury. Younger children decreased their weights for height; older patients mainly increased theirs. Alterations during the first year of follow-up correlated with alterations until 2 and 3 years (r = 0.91 and r = 0.76, respectively). Once initiated, net weight gain continued, whereas net weight losses diminished with time. Preburn equivalent weights, however, could not be reached within 3 years. Special attention must be paid to children who are close to or less than their ideal body weights at the time of injury, especially if they are young, because further weight loss may be critical. Outpatient nutritional therapy should he focused to control these developments.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)589-595
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Burn Care and Rehabilitation
Volume16
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 1995

Fingerprint

Burns
Weight Loss
Pediatrics
Weights and Measures
Research
Ideal Body Weight
Body Surface Area
Wounds and Injuries
Weight Gain
Outpatients
History
Growth
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rehabilitation
  • Surgery
  • Nursing(all)
  • Health Professions(all)
  • Emergency Medicine

Cite this

The 1995 Clinical Research Award : Younger pediatric patients with burns are at risk for continuing postdischarge weight loss. / Mittendorfer, B.; Hildreth, M. A.; Desai, M. H.; Herndon, David.

In: Journal of Burn Care and Rehabilitation, Vol. 16, No. 6, 1995, p. 589-595.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mittendorfer, B. ; Hildreth, M. A. ; Desai, M. H. ; Herndon, David. / The 1995 Clinical Research Award : Younger pediatric patients with burns are at risk for continuing postdischarge weight loss. In: Journal of Burn Care and Rehabilitation. 1995 ; Vol. 16, No. 6. pp. 589-595.
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