The 2002 introduction of West Nile virus into Harris County, Texas, an area historically endemic for St. Louis encephalitis

Kristy M. Lillibridge, Ray Parsons, Yvonne Randle, Amelia P.A. Travassos Da Rosa, Hilda Guzman, Marina Siirin, Taweesak Wuithiranyagool, Christina Hailey, Stephen Higgs, Adil A. Bala, Rhia Pascua, Tamra Meyer, Dana L. Vanlandingham, Robert B. Tesh

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60 Scopus citations

Abstract

Harris County, Texas, is an endemic area of St. Louis encephalitis (SLE); and an active surveillance program that monitors SLE virus activity in mosquitoes, birds, and humans has been in place there for the past 28 years. In June of 2002, West Nile (WN) virus appeared in Houston and quickly spread throughout the region. This report describes the results of 12 years of SLE surveillance in Harris County and the contrasting pattern of WN virus activity, when it arrived in 2002. Our data indicate that both SLE and WN viruses can coexist, despite their ecologic, antigenic, and genetic similarities, and that both viruses will probably persist in this geographic region.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)676-681
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene
Volume70
Issue number6
StatePublished - Jun 1 2004

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Parasitology
  • Virology
  • Infectious Diseases

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    Lillibridge, K. M., Parsons, R., Randle, Y., Travassos Da Rosa, A. P. A., Guzman, H., Siirin, M., Wuithiranyagool, T., Hailey, C., Higgs, S., Bala, A. A., Pascua, R., Meyer, T., Vanlandingham, D. L., & Tesh, R. B. (2004). The 2002 introduction of West Nile virus into Harris County, Texas, an area historically endemic for St. Louis encephalitis. American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, 70(6), 676-681.