The ancestry question and ethnic heterogeneity: The case of Arab Americans

Florence J. Dallo, Kristine J. Ajrouch, Soham Al-Snih

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

This article uses US Census data to investigate change over time in Arab American profiles. In 2000, a higher proportion of children (0 to 13 years of age), women, and those who lived in the Northeast identified with an Arab/non-Arab ancestry compared to an Arab-only ancestry. In 1980 and 2000, a higher proportion (∼90%) of those who identified with an Arab/non-Arab ancestry was US born compared to only one-half of those who identified with an Arab-only ancestry. Those who identified with an Arab-only ancestry were more likely to not be US citizens than those who identified with an Arab/non-Arab ancestry. These findings suggest Arab Americans are a heterogeneous group.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)505-517
Number of pages13
JournalInternational Migration Review
Volume42
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2008

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Demography
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)

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