The ancestry question and ethnic heterogeneity

The case of Arab Americans

Florence J. Dallo, Kristine J. Ajrouch, Soham Al Snih al snih

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This article uses US Census data to investigate change over time in Arab American profiles. In 2000, a higher proportion of children (0 to 13 years of age), women, and those who lived in the Northeast identified with an Arab/non-Arab ancestry compared to an Arab-only ancestry. In 1980 and 2000, a higher proportion (∼90%) of those who identified with an Arab/non-Arab ancestry was US born compared to only one-half of those who identified with an Arab-only ancestry. Those who identified with an Arab-only ancestry were more likely to not be US citizens than those who identified with an Arab/non-Arab ancestry. These findings suggest Arab Americans are a heterogeneous group.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)505-517
Number of pages13
JournalInternational Migration Review
Volume42
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2008

Fingerprint

US citizen
Arab
census
Group
time
Arab Americans
Ancestry

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Demography

Cite this

The ancestry question and ethnic heterogeneity : The case of Arab Americans. / Dallo, Florence J.; Ajrouch, Kristine J.; Al Snih al snih, Soham.

In: International Migration Review, Vol. 42, No. 2, 06.2008, p. 505-517.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Dallo, Florence J. ; Ajrouch, Kristine J. ; Al Snih al snih, Soham. / The ancestry question and ethnic heterogeneity : The case of Arab Americans. In: International Migration Review. 2008 ; Vol. 42, No. 2. pp. 505-517.
@article{f0db251ecb1f4f248a1e3a7701ad1871,
title = "The ancestry question and ethnic heterogeneity: The case of Arab Americans",
abstract = "This article uses US Census data to investigate change over time in Arab American profiles. In 2000, a higher proportion of children (0 to 13 years of age), women, and those who lived in the Northeast identified with an Arab/non-Arab ancestry compared to an Arab-only ancestry. In 1980 and 2000, a higher proportion (∼90{\%}) of those who identified with an Arab/non-Arab ancestry was US born compared to only one-half of those who identified with an Arab-only ancestry. Those who identified with an Arab-only ancestry were more likely to not be US citizens than those who identified with an Arab/non-Arab ancestry. These findings suggest Arab Americans are a heterogeneous group.",
author = "Dallo, {Florence J.} and Ajrouch, {Kristine J.} and {Al Snih al snih}, Soham",
year = "2008",
month = "6",
doi = "10.1111/j.1747-7379.2008.00133.x",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "42",
pages = "505--517",
journal = "International Migration Review",
issn = "0197-9183",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The ancestry question and ethnic heterogeneity

T2 - The case of Arab Americans

AU - Dallo, Florence J.

AU - Ajrouch, Kristine J.

AU - Al Snih al snih, Soham

PY - 2008/6

Y1 - 2008/6

N2 - This article uses US Census data to investigate change over time in Arab American profiles. In 2000, a higher proportion of children (0 to 13 years of age), women, and those who lived in the Northeast identified with an Arab/non-Arab ancestry compared to an Arab-only ancestry. In 1980 and 2000, a higher proportion (∼90%) of those who identified with an Arab/non-Arab ancestry was US born compared to only one-half of those who identified with an Arab-only ancestry. Those who identified with an Arab-only ancestry were more likely to not be US citizens than those who identified with an Arab/non-Arab ancestry. These findings suggest Arab Americans are a heterogeneous group.

AB - This article uses US Census data to investigate change over time in Arab American profiles. In 2000, a higher proportion of children (0 to 13 years of age), women, and those who lived in the Northeast identified with an Arab/non-Arab ancestry compared to an Arab-only ancestry. In 1980 and 2000, a higher proportion (∼90%) of those who identified with an Arab/non-Arab ancestry was US born compared to only one-half of those who identified with an Arab-only ancestry. Those who identified with an Arab-only ancestry were more likely to not be US citizens than those who identified with an Arab/non-Arab ancestry. These findings suggest Arab Americans are a heterogeneous group.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=44349091536&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=44349091536&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/j.1747-7379.2008.00133.x

DO - 10.1111/j.1747-7379.2008.00133.x

M3 - Article

VL - 42

SP - 505

EP - 517

JO - International Migration Review

JF - International Migration Review

SN - 0197-9183

IS - 2

ER -