The archives of pathology & laboratory medicine: The most widely read pathology journal today

Timothy Craig Allen

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

The Archives of Pathology & Laboratory Medicine was first published in 1926 as a subspecialty journal of the American Medical Association. It became the official journal of the College of American Pathologists in 1995. Under the dynamic leadership of its most recent editor-inchief, Philip T. Cagle, MD, and his vibrant editorial board, the ARCHIVES has nearly doubled its impact factor and become the most widely read general pathology journal today. Dr Cagle has consistently added leading pathologists to the editorial board, and the collective expertise of these individuals is clearly evident in new, cutting-edge journal masthead sections. The ARCHIVES has featured innovative content in the field of digital pathology, including articles on the utilization of smart phones in pathology and incorporation of whole-slide images and videos into the content of articles. Special sections have characterized the ARCHIVES during the current editorial board's tenure and have proven immensely popular with the journal's readership. As the ARCHIVES celebrates its 90th anniversary, its editorial board remains committed to providing insightful and relevant medical knowledge. The journal's open access Web site (www.archivesofpathology. org) allows the dissemination of this knowledge to every corner of the globe at no expense to those who wish to be educated or improve their medical practice.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)953-955
Number of pages3
JournalArchives of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine
Volume140
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2016

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • Medicine(all)
  • Medical Laboratory Technology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'The archives of pathology & laboratory medicine: The most widely read pathology journal today'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this