The association between serological and dietary vitamin D levels and hepatitis C-related liver disease risk differs in African American and white males

D. L. White, S. Tavakoli-Tabasi, F. Kanwal, D. J. Ramsey, A. Hashmi, J. Kuzniarek, P. Patel, J. Francis, H. B. El-Serag

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Vitamin D may affect the severity of HCV-related liver disease. Aim: To examine the association between serum vitamin D levels and advanced liver disease in a multiethnic US cohort of HCV patients, and account for dietary and supplemental intake. Methods: We measured serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels and used FibroSURE-ActiTest to assess hepatic pathology in a cohort of HCV-infected male veterans. We estimated and adjusted for daily intake of vitamin D from diet using a Dietary History Questionnaire, and dispensed prescriptions prior to study enrolment. We used race-stratified logistic regression analyses to evaluate the relationship between serum vitamin D levels and risk of advanced fibrosis (F3/F4-F4) and advanced inflammation (A2/A3-A3). Results: A total of 163 African American (AA) and 126 White non-Hispanics were studied. Overall, ∼44% of AAs and 15% of Whites were vitamin D deficient (50 ng/mL). Among AAs, patients with elevated serum vitamin D levels had significantly higher odds of advanced fibrosis (OR = 12.91, P = 0.03) than those with normal levels. In contrast, AAs with insufficient or deficient levels had > two-fold excess risk of advanced inflammation (P = 0.06). Among White males there was no association between vitamin D levels and advanced fibrosis (F3/F4-F4) or inflammation (A2/A3-A3) risk. Conclusions: We observed potential differences in the association between vitamin D levels and degree of HCV-related hepatic fibrosis between White and African American males. Additional research is necessary to confirm that high serum vitamin D levels may be associated with advanced fibrosis risk in African American males, and to evaluate whether racial differences exist in HCV-infected females.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)28-37
Number of pages10
JournalAlimentary Pharmacology and Therapeutics
Volume38
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2013
Externally publishedYes

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Hepatitis C
Vitamin D
African Americans
Liver Diseases
Fibrosis
Serum
Inflammation
varespladib methyl
Liver
Veterans
Prescriptions
Logistic Models
Regression Analysis
Pathology
Diet
Research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology (medical)

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The association between serological and dietary vitamin D levels and hepatitis C-related liver disease risk differs in African American and white males. / White, D. L.; Tavakoli-Tabasi, S.; Kanwal, F.; Ramsey, D. J.; Hashmi, A.; Kuzniarek, J.; Patel, P.; Francis, J.; El-Serag, H. B.

In: Alimentary Pharmacology and Therapeutics, Vol. 38, No. 1, 07.2013, p. 28-37.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

White, DL, Tavakoli-Tabasi, S, Kanwal, F, Ramsey, DJ, Hashmi, A, Kuzniarek, J, Patel, P, Francis, J & El-Serag, HB 2013, 'The association between serological and dietary vitamin D levels and hepatitis C-related liver disease risk differs in African American and white males', Alimentary Pharmacology and Therapeutics, vol. 38, no. 1, pp. 28-37. https://doi.org/10.1111/apt.12341
White, D. L. ; Tavakoli-Tabasi, S. ; Kanwal, F. ; Ramsey, D. J. ; Hashmi, A. ; Kuzniarek, J. ; Patel, P. ; Francis, J. ; El-Serag, H. B. / The association between serological and dietary vitamin D levels and hepatitis C-related liver disease risk differs in African American and white males. In: Alimentary Pharmacology and Therapeutics. 2013 ; Vol. 38, No. 1. pp. 28-37.
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abstract = "Background: Vitamin D may affect the severity of HCV-related liver disease. Aim: To examine the association between serum vitamin D levels and advanced liver disease in a multiethnic US cohort of HCV patients, and account for dietary and supplemental intake. Methods: We measured serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels and used FibroSURE-ActiTest to assess hepatic pathology in a cohort of HCV-infected male veterans. We estimated and adjusted for daily intake of vitamin D from diet using a Dietary History Questionnaire, and dispensed prescriptions prior to study enrolment. We used race-stratified logistic regression analyses to evaluate the relationship between serum vitamin D levels and risk of advanced fibrosis (F3/F4-F4) and advanced inflammation (A2/A3-A3). Results: A total of 163 African American (AA) and 126 White non-Hispanics were studied. Overall, ∼44{\%} of AAs and 15{\%} of Whites were vitamin D deficient (50 ng/mL). Among AAs, patients with elevated serum vitamin D levels had significantly higher odds of advanced fibrosis (OR = 12.91, P = 0.03) than those with normal levels. In contrast, AAs with insufficient or deficient levels had > two-fold excess risk of advanced inflammation (P = 0.06). Among White males there was no association between vitamin D levels and advanced fibrosis (F3/F4-F4) or inflammation (A2/A3-A3) risk. Conclusions: We observed potential differences in the association between vitamin D levels and degree of HCV-related hepatic fibrosis between White and African American males. Additional research is necessary to confirm that high serum vitamin D levels may be associated with advanced fibrosis risk in African American males, and to evaluate whether racial differences exist in HCV-infected females.",
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T1 - The association between serological and dietary vitamin D levels and hepatitis C-related liver disease risk differs in African American and white males

AU - White, D. L.

AU - Tavakoli-Tabasi, S.

AU - Kanwal, F.

AU - Ramsey, D. J.

AU - Hashmi, A.

AU - Kuzniarek, J.

AU - Patel, P.

AU - Francis, J.

AU - El-Serag, H. B.

PY - 2013/7

Y1 - 2013/7

N2 - Background: Vitamin D may affect the severity of HCV-related liver disease. Aim: To examine the association between serum vitamin D levels and advanced liver disease in a multiethnic US cohort of HCV patients, and account for dietary and supplemental intake. Methods: We measured serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels and used FibroSURE-ActiTest to assess hepatic pathology in a cohort of HCV-infected male veterans. We estimated and adjusted for daily intake of vitamin D from diet using a Dietary History Questionnaire, and dispensed prescriptions prior to study enrolment. We used race-stratified logistic regression analyses to evaluate the relationship between serum vitamin D levels and risk of advanced fibrosis (F3/F4-F4) and advanced inflammation (A2/A3-A3). Results: A total of 163 African American (AA) and 126 White non-Hispanics were studied. Overall, ∼44% of AAs and 15% of Whites were vitamin D deficient (50 ng/mL). Among AAs, patients with elevated serum vitamin D levels had significantly higher odds of advanced fibrosis (OR = 12.91, P = 0.03) than those with normal levels. In contrast, AAs with insufficient or deficient levels had > two-fold excess risk of advanced inflammation (P = 0.06). Among White males there was no association between vitamin D levels and advanced fibrosis (F3/F4-F4) or inflammation (A2/A3-A3) risk. Conclusions: We observed potential differences in the association between vitamin D levels and degree of HCV-related hepatic fibrosis between White and African American males. Additional research is necessary to confirm that high serum vitamin D levels may be associated with advanced fibrosis risk in African American males, and to evaluate whether racial differences exist in HCV-infected females.

AB - Background: Vitamin D may affect the severity of HCV-related liver disease. Aim: To examine the association between serum vitamin D levels and advanced liver disease in a multiethnic US cohort of HCV patients, and account for dietary and supplemental intake. Methods: We measured serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels and used FibroSURE-ActiTest to assess hepatic pathology in a cohort of HCV-infected male veterans. We estimated and adjusted for daily intake of vitamin D from diet using a Dietary History Questionnaire, and dispensed prescriptions prior to study enrolment. We used race-stratified logistic regression analyses to evaluate the relationship between serum vitamin D levels and risk of advanced fibrosis (F3/F4-F4) and advanced inflammation (A2/A3-A3). Results: A total of 163 African American (AA) and 126 White non-Hispanics were studied. Overall, ∼44% of AAs and 15% of Whites were vitamin D deficient (50 ng/mL). Among AAs, patients with elevated serum vitamin D levels had significantly higher odds of advanced fibrosis (OR = 12.91, P = 0.03) than those with normal levels. In contrast, AAs with insufficient or deficient levels had > two-fold excess risk of advanced inflammation (P = 0.06). Among White males there was no association between vitamin D levels and advanced fibrosis (F3/F4-F4) or inflammation (A2/A3-A3) risk. Conclusions: We observed potential differences in the association between vitamin D levels and degree of HCV-related hepatic fibrosis between White and African American males. Additional research is necessary to confirm that high serum vitamin D levels may be associated with advanced fibrosis risk in African American males, and to evaluate whether racial differences exist in HCV-infected females.

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