The association between tobacco, alcohol, and drug use, stress, and depression among uninsured free clinic patients: U.S.-born English speakers, non-U.S.-born English speakers, and Spanish speakers

Akiko Kamimura, Jeanie Ashby, Jennifer Tabler, Maziar M. Nourian, Ha Ngoc Trinh, Jason Chen, Justine J. Reel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

The abuse of substances is a significant public health issue. Perceived stress and depression have been found to be related to the abuse of substances. The purpose of this study is to examine the prevalence of substance use (i.e., alcohol problems, smoking, and drug use) and the association between substance use, perceived stress, and depression among free clinic patients. Patients completed a self-administered survey in 2015 (N = 504). The overall prevalence of substance use among free clinic patients was not high compared to the U.S. general population. U.S.-born English speakers reported a higher prevalence rate of tobacco smoking and drug use than did non-U.S.-born English speakers and Spanish speakers. Alcohol problems and smoking were significantly related to higher levels of perceived stress and depression. Substance use prevention and education should be included in general health education programs. U.S.-born English speakers would need additional attention. Mental health intervention would be essential to prevention and intervention.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-15
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Ethnicity in Substance Abuse
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 23 2016
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

nicotine
Tobacco
drug use
smoking
Smoking
alcohol
Alcohols
Depression
Substance-Related Disorders
abuse
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Health Education
health promotion
Mental Health
Public Health
public health
mental health
Education
Population
education

Keywords

  • Alcohol problems
  • depression
  • drug use
  • free clinics
  • stress
  • tobacco smoking

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Health(social science)

Cite this

The association between tobacco, alcohol, and drug use, stress, and depression among uninsured free clinic patients : U.S.-born English speakers, non-U.S.-born English speakers, and Spanish speakers. / Kamimura, Akiko; Ashby, Jeanie; Tabler, Jennifer; Nourian, Maziar M.; Trinh, Ha Ngoc; Chen, Jason; Reel, Justine J.

In: Journal of Ethnicity in Substance Abuse, 23.01.2016, p. 1-15.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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