The association of body mass index and prostate-specific antigen in a population-based study

Jacques Baillargeon, Brad H. Pollock, Alan R. Kristal, Patrick Bradshaw, Javier Hernandez, Joseph Basler, Betsy Higgins, Steve Lynch, Thomas Rozanski, Dean Troyer, Ian Thompson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

191 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND. Recent studies of men with prostate carcinoma suggest that obesity may be associated with more advanced-stage disease and lower overall survival rates. One possible link between body mass index (BMI) and prostate carcinoma prognosis may be disease ascertainment. Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is widely used to screen for prostate carcinoma. METHODS. The authors examined the association between BMI and PSA in a population-based study of 2779 men without prostate carcinoma. Between 2001 and 2004, these men were enrolled in a study sponsored by the San Antonio Center of Biomarkers of Risk, a clinical and epidemiologic center of the Early Detection Research Network of the National Cancer Institute. RESULTS. The mean PSA value decreased in a linear fashion with an increase in BMI category, from 1.01 ng/mL in normal weight men to 0.69 ng/mL in obese (Class III) men, after adjusting for race/ethnicity and age. CONCLUSIONS. Lower levels of PSA in obese and overweight men could mask biologically consequential prostate carcinoma.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1092-1095
Number of pages4
JournalCancer
Volume103
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2005
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Prostate-Specific Antigen
Body Mass Index
Prostate
Carcinoma
Population
National Cancer Institute (U.S.)
Masks
Survival Rate
Obesity
Biomarkers
Weights and Measures
Research

Keywords

  • Body mass index
  • Cancer risk
  • Prostate carcinoma
  • Prostate-specific antigen

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Oncology

Cite this

Baillargeon, J., Pollock, B. H., Kristal, A. R., Bradshaw, P., Hernandez, J., Basler, J., ... Thompson, I. (2005). The association of body mass index and prostate-specific antigen in a population-based study. Cancer, 103(5), 1092-1095. https://doi.org/10.1002/cncr.20856

The association of body mass index and prostate-specific antigen in a population-based study. / Baillargeon, Jacques; Pollock, Brad H.; Kristal, Alan R.; Bradshaw, Patrick; Hernandez, Javier; Basler, Joseph; Higgins, Betsy; Lynch, Steve; Rozanski, Thomas; Troyer, Dean; Thompson, Ian.

In: Cancer, Vol. 103, No. 5, 01.03.2005, p. 1092-1095.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Baillargeon, J, Pollock, BH, Kristal, AR, Bradshaw, P, Hernandez, J, Basler, J, Higgins, B, Lynch, S, Rozanski, T, Troyer, D & Thompson, I 2005, 'The association of body mass index and prostate-specific antigen in a population-based study', Cancer, vol. 103, no. 5, pp. 1092-1095. https://doi.org/10.1002/cncr.20856
Baillargeon J, Pollock BH, Kristal AR, Bradshaw P, Hernandez J, Basler J et al. The association of body mass index and prostate-specific antigen in a population-based study. Cancer. 2005 Mar 1;103(5):1092-1095. https://doi.org/10.1002/cncr.20856
Baillargeon, Jacques ; Pollock, Brad H. ; Kristal, Alan R. ; Bradshaw, Patrick ; Hernandez, Javier ; Basler, Joseph ; Higgins, Betsy ; Lynch, Steve ; Rozanski, Thomas ; Troyer, Dean ; Thompson, Ian. / The association of body mass index and prostate-specific antigen in a population-based study. In: Cancer. 2005 ; Vol. 103, No. 5. pp. 1092-1095.
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