The catabolic effects of prolonged inactivity and acute hypercortisolemia are offset by dietary supplementation

Douglas Paddon-Jones, Melinda Sheffield-Moore, Randall Urban, Asle Aarsland, Robert R. Wolfe, Arny A. Ferrando

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

43 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We compared the anabolic stimulus provided by an essential amino acid and carbohydrate (AA/CHO) supplement to a mixed clinical meal during bed rest (BR) and episodic hypercortisolemia (∼24 μg·dl-1). In the experimental (EXP; n = 7) and control (CON; n = 6) groups, femoral arteriovenous blood samples and vastus lateralis biopsy samples were obtained during a primed constant infusion of L-[ring-2H5]phenylalanine and a 14-h infusion of hydrocortisone sodium succinate (60 μg·kg·h -1) before (pre-BR) and after (post-BR) 28 d of BR. Muscle protein kinetics were calculated during the postabsorptive state, for 2.5 h after ingestion of a meal and for 2.5 h after ingestion of an AA/CHO supplement (EXP) or placebo (CON). Postabsorptive net phenylalanine balance values were as follows: EXP, -35.14 ± 2.93, and CON, -32.60 ± 6.65 (pre-BR); and EXP, -32.91 ± 5.67, and CON, -30.43 ± 6.28 nmol phe·ml -1·100 ml leg volume-1 (post-BR). After AA/CHO supplementation, net phenylalanine balance improved to 33.51 ± 8.06 (pre-BR) and 24.15 ± 11.4 nmol phe·ml-1·100 ml leg volume-1 (post-BR), but remained negative after the meal. Cumulative 5.5-h mixed muscle fractional synthetic rate was greater in the EXP group pre-BR (EXP, 0.108 ± 0.01, and CON, 0.073 ± 0.04%·h-1) and post-BR (EXP, 0.111 ± 0.015, and CON, 0.05 ± 0.002%·h-1). Unlike a typical clinical meal, AA/ CHO supplementation stimulated net muscle protein synthesis despite acute hypercortisolemia and prolonged inactivity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1453-1459
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism
Volume90
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2005

Fingerprint

Bed Rest
Dietary Supplements
Phenylalanine
Muscle Proteins
Essential Amino Acids
Biopsy
Succinic Acid
Meals
Muscle
Hydrocortisone
Blood
Sodium
Carbohydrates
Kinetics
Leg
Eating
Quadriceps Muscle
Thigh
Placebos
Muscles

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

Cite this

The catabolic effects of prolonged inactivity and acute hypercortisolemia are offset by dietary supplementation. / Paddon-Jones, Douglas; Sheffield-Moore, Melinda; Urban, Randall; Aarsland, Asle; Wolfe, Robert R.; Ferrando, Arny A.

In: Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, Vol. 90, No. 3, 03.2005, p. 1453-1459.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{4ec2ac782b18475ab1d76c8368a3720d,
title = "The catabolic effects of prolonged inactivity and acute hypercortisolemia are offset by dietary supplementation",
abstract = "We compared the anabolic stimulus provided by an essential amino acid and carbohydrate (AA/CHO) supplement to a mixed clinical meal during bed rest (BR) and episodic hypercortisolemia (∼24 μg·dl-1). In the experimental (EXP; n = 7) and control (CON; n = 6) groups, femoral arteriovenous blood samples and vastus lateralis biopsy samples were obtained during a primed constant infusion of L-[ring-2H5]phenylalanine and a 14-h infusion of hydrocortisone sodium succinate (60 μg·kg·h -1) before (pre-BR) and after (post-BR) 28 d of BR. Muscle protein kinetics were calculated during the postabsorptive state, for 2.5 h after ingestion of a meal and for 2.5 h after ingestion of an AA/CHO supplement (EXP) or placebo (CON). Postabsorptive net phenylalanine balance values were as follows: EXP, -35.14 ± 2.93, and CON, -32.60 ± 6.65 (pre-BR); and EXP, -32.91 ± 5.67, and CON, -30.43 ± 6.28 nmol phe·ml -1·100 ml leg volume-1 (post-BR). After AA/CHO supplementation, net phenylalanine balance improved to 33.51 ± 8.06 (pre-BR) and 24.15 ± 11.4 nmol phe·ml-1·100 ml leg volume-1 (post-BR), but remained negative after the meal. Cumulative 5.5-h mixed muscle fractional synthetic rate was greater in the EXP group pre-BR (EXP, 0.108 ± 0.01, and CON, 0.073 ± 0.04{\%}·h-1) and post-BR (EXP, 0.111 ± 0.015, and CON, 0.05 ± 0.002{\%}·h-1). Unlike a typical clinical meal, AA/ CHO supplementation stimulated net muscle protein synthesis despite acute hypercortisolemia and prolonged inactivity.",
author = "Douglas Paddon-Jones and Melinda Sheffield-Moore and Randall Urban and Asle Aarsland and Wolfe, {Robert R.} and Ferrando, {Arny A.}",
year = "2005",
month = "3",
doi = "10.1210/jc.2004-1702",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "90",
pages = "1453--1459",
journal = "Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism",
issn = "0021-972X",
publisher = "The Endocrine Society",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The catabolic effects of prolonged inactivity and acute hypercortisolemia are offset by dietary supplementation

AU - Paddon-Jones, Douglas

AU - Sheffield-Moore, Melinda

AU - Urban, Randall

AU - Aarsland, Asle

AU - Wolfe, Robert R.

AU - Ferrando, Arny A.

PY - 2005/3

Y1 - 2005/3

N2 - We compared the anabolic stimulus provided by an essential amino acid and carbohydrate (AA/CHO) supplement to a mixed clinical meal during bed rest (BR) and episodic hypercortisolemia (∼24 μg·dl-1). In the experimental (EXP; n = 7) and control (CON; n = 6) groups, femoral arteriovenous blood samples and vastus lateralis biopsy samples were obtained during a primed constant infusion of L-[ring-2H5]phenylalanine and a 14-h infusion of hydrocortisone sodium succinate (60 μg·kg·h -1) before (pre-BR) and after (post-BR) 28 d of BR. Muscle protein kinetics were calculated during the postabsorptive state, for 2.5 h after ingestion of a meal and for 2.5 h after ingestion of an AA/CHO supplement (EXP) or placebo (CON). Postabsorptive net phenylalanine balance values were as follows: EXP, -35.14 ± 2.93, and CON, -32.60 ± 6.65 (pre-BR); and EXP, -32.91 ± 5.67, and CON, -30.43 ± 6.28 nmol phe·ml -1·100 ml leg volume-1 (post-BR). After AA/CHO supplementation, net phenylalanine balance improved to 33.51 ± 8.06 (pre-BR) and 24.15 ± 11.4 nmol phe·ml-1·100 ml leg volume-1 (post-BR), but remained negative after the meal. Cumulative 5.5-h mixed muscle fractional synthetic rate was greater in the EXP group pre-BR (EXP, 0.108 ± 0.01, and CON, 0.073 ± 0.04%·h-1) and post-BR (EXP, 0.111 ± 0.015, and CON, 0.05 ± 0.002%·h-1). Unlike a typical clinical meal, AA/ CHO supplementation stimulated net muscle protein synthesis despite acute hypercortisolemia and prolonged inactivity.

AB - We compared the anabolic stimulus provided by an essential amino acid and carbohydrate (AA/CHO) supplement to a mixed clinical meal during bed rest (BR) and episodic hypercortisolemia (∼24 μg·dl-1). In the experimental (EXP; n = 7) and control (CON; n = 6) groups, femoral arteriovenous blood samples and vastus lateralis biopsy samples were obtained during a primed constant infusion of L-[ring-2H5]phenylalanine and a 14-h infusion of hydrocortisone sodium succinate (60 μg·kg·h -1) before (pre-BR) and after (post-BR) 28 d of BR. Muscle protein kinetics were calculated during the postabsorptive state, for 2.5 h after ingestion of a meal and for 2.5 h after ingestion of an AA/CHO supplement (EXP) or placebo (CON). Postabsorptive net phenylalanine balance values were as follows: EXP, -35.14 ± 2.93, and CON, -32.60 ± 6.65 (pre-BR); and EXP, -32.91 ± 5.67, and CON, -30.43 ± 6.28 nmol phe·ml -1·100 ml leg volume-1 (post-BR). After AA/CHO supplementation, net phenylalanine balance improved to 33.51 ± 8.06 (pre-BR) and 24.15 ± 11.4 nmol phe·ml-1·100 ml leg volume-1 (post-BR), but remained negative after the meal. Cumulative 5.5-h mixed muscle fractional synthetic rate was greater in the EXP group pre-BR (EXP, 0.108 ± 0.01, and CON, 0.073 ± 0.04%·h-1) and post-BR (EXP, 0.111 ± 0.015, and CON, 0.05 ± 0.002%·h-1). Unlike a typical clinical meal, AA/ CHO supplementation stimulated net muscle protein synthesis despite acute hypercortisolemia and prolonged inactivity.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=15944409550&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=15944409550&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1210/jc.2004-1702

DO - 10.1210/jc.2004-1702

M3 - Article

C2 - 15598679

AN - SCOPUS:15944409550

VL - 90

SP - 1453

EP - 1459

JO - Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism

JF - Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism

SN - 0021-972X

IS - 3

ER -