The clinically used PARP inhibitor olaparib improves organ function, suppresses inflammatory responses and accelerates wound healing in a murine model of third-degree burn injury

Akbar Ahmad, Gabor Olah, David N. Herndon, Csaba Szabo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background and Purpose: The PARP inhibitor olaparib has recently been approved for human use for the therapy of cancer. Considering the role of PARP in critical illness, we tested the effect of olaparib in a murine model of burn injury, in order to begin exploring the feasibility of repurposing olaparib for the therapy of burn patients. Experimental Approach: Mice were subjected to scald burn injury and randomized into vehicle or olaparib (10 mg·kg−1·day−1 i.p.) groups. Outcome variables included indices of organ injury, clinical chemistry parameters, plasma levels of inflammatory mediators (at 24 h, 7 and 21 days) and burn wound size (at 21 days). Key Results: Olaparib reduced myeloperoxidase levels in heart and lung homogenates and reduced malondialdehyde levels in all tissues 24 h post-burn. Olaparib also reduced circulating alkaline aminotransferase, amylase and blood urea nitrogen and creatinine levels, indicative of protection against hepatic, pancreatic and renal dysfunction. Pro-inflammatory mediator (TNF-α, IL-1β, IFN-γ, GCSF, GM-CSF, eotaxin, KC, MIP-1-α and IL-3, 6 and 12) levels as well as the levels of several mediators that are generally considered anti-inflammatory (IL-4, 10 and 13) were reduced by olaparib. Plasma troponin-I levels (an indicator of skeletal muscle damage) was also attenuated by olaparib. Finally, olaparib stimulated wound healing. Conclusions and Implications: The clinically approved PARP inhibitor olaparib improves organ function, suppresses inflammatory responses and accelerates wound healing in murine burn injury. The data raise the potential utility of olaparib for severe burn injury. Linked Articles: This article is part of a themed section on Inventing New Therapies Without Reinventing the Wheel: The Power of Drug Repurposing. To view the other articles in this section visit http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/bph.v175.2/issuetoc.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)232-245
Number of pages14
JournalBritish Journal of Pharmacology
Volume175
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2018

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology

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