The CTSA as an Exemplar Framework for Developing Multidisciplinary Translational Teams

William Calhoun, Kevin Wooten, Suresh Bhavnani, Karl Anderson, Jean Freeman, Allan R. Brasier

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Translational science requires that scientists from multiple disciplines work together to improve the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of human disease. Although a literature exists on the design and management of multidisciplinary teams, little has been written on multidisciplinary translational teams (MTTs). MTTs are distinct hybrid entities, with goals taken from both industry and academic models. We identified 30 design factors in 10 domains from a literature survey relevant to our MTT model: specific goals, structures, and processes. These dimensions were adapted to our own institutional environment in the selection and management of 11 MTTs that exploited resources of University of Texas Medical Branch (UTMB) Clinical and Translational Sciences Awards (CTSA). Case illustrations of two specific MTTs illustrate some of the challenges encountered and opportunities realized in terms of education and scientific advances. Network depiction of disciplinarity indicated that CTSA KRs and CTSA leadership contributed to discipline diversity especially in small (or nascent) MTTs. A separate depiction of MTT-KR utilization indicated that data analysis, translational technologies, and novel methods were heavily utilized by MTTs, whereas other KRs contributed significant effort to infrastructure development. We conclude that the CTSA can provide a rich, infrastructural framework and scientific environment for the development of successful MTTs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)60-71
Number of pages12
JournalClinical and Translational Science
Volume6
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2013

Fingerprint

Education
Industry
Technology
Surveys and Questionnaires

Keywords

  • Multidisciplinary teams
  • Team science
  • Translational research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutics(all)

Cite this

The CTSA as an Exemplar Framework for Developing Multidisciplinary Translational Teams. / Calhoun, William; Wooten, Kevin; Bhavnani, Suresh; Anderson, Karl; Freeman, Jean; Brasier, Allan R.

In: Clinical and Translational Science, Vol. 6, No. 1, 02.2013, p. 60-71.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{62571cb4a03a4de490b0a68f028080c2,
title = "The CTSA as an Exemplar Framework for Developing Multidisciplinary Translational Teams",
abstract = "Translational science requires that scientists from multiple disciplines work together to improve the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of human disease. Although a literature exists on the design and management of multidisciplinary teams, little has been written on multidisciplinary translational teams (MTTs). MTTs are distinct hybrid entities, with goals taken from both industry and academic models. We identified 30 design factors in 10 domains from a literature survey relevant to our MTT model: specific goals, structures, and processes. These dimensions were adapted to our own institutional environment in the selection and management of 11 MTTs that exploited resources of University of Texas Medical Branch (UTMB) Clinical and Translational Sciences Awards (CTSA). Case illustrations of two specific MTTs illustrate some of the challenges encountered and opportunities realized in terms of education and scientific advances. Network depiction of disciplinarity indicated that CTSA KRs and CTSA leadership contributed to discipline diversity especially in small (or nascent) MTTs. A separate depiction of MTT-KR utilization indicated that data analysis, translational technologies, and novel methods were heavily utilized by MTTs, whereas other KRs contributed significant effort to infrastructure development. We conclude that the CTSA can provide a rich, infrastructural framework and scientific environment for the development of successful MTTs.",
keywords = "Multidisciplinary teams, Team science, Translational research",
author = "William Calhoun and Kevin Wooten and Suresh Bhavnani and Karl Anderson and Jean Freeman and Brasier, {Allan R.}",
year = "2013",
month = "2",
doi = "10.1111/cts.12004",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "6",
pages = "60--71",
journal = "Clinical and Translational Science",
issn = "1752-8054",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The CTSA as an Exemplar Framework for Developing Multidisciplinary Translational Teams

AU - Calhoun, William

AU - Wooten, Kevin

AU - Bhavnani, Suresh

AU - Anderson, Karl

AU - Freeman, Jean

AU - Brasier, Allan R.

PY - 2013/2

Y1 - 2013/2

N2 - Translational science requires that scientists from multiple disciplines work together to improve the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of human disease. Although a literature exists on the design and management of multidisciplinary teams, little has been written on multidisciplinary translational teams (MTTs). MTTs are distinct hybrid entities, with goals taken from both industry and academic models. We identified 30 design factors in 10 domains from a literature survey relevant to our MTT model: specific goals, structures, and processes. These dimensions were adapted to our own institutional environment in the selection and management of 11 MTTs that exploited resources of University of Texas Medical Branch (UTMB) Clinical and Translational Sciences Awards (CTSA). Case illustrations of two specific MTTs illustrate some of the challenges encountered and opportunities realized in terms of education and scientific advances. Network depiction of disciplinarity indicated that CTSA KRs and CTSA leadership contributed to discipline diversity especially in small (or nascent) MTTs. A separate depiction of MTT-KR utilization indicated that data analysis, translational technologies, and novel methods were heavily utilized by MTTs, whereas other KRs contributed significant effort to infrastructure development. We conclude that the CTSA can provide a rich, infrastructural framework and scientific environment for the development of successful MTTs.

AB - Translational science requires that scientists from multiple disciplines work together to improve the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of human disease. Although a literature exists on the design and management of multidisciplinary teams, little has been written on multidisciplinary translational teams (MTTs). MTTs are distinct hybrid entities, with goals taken from both industry and academic models. We identified 30 design factors in 10 domains from a literature survey relevant to our MTT model: specific goals, structures, and processes. These dimensions were adapted to our own institutional environment in the selection and management of 11 MTTs that exploited resources of University of Texas Medical Branch (UTMB) Clinical and Translational Sciences Awards (CTSA). Case illustrations of two specific MTTs illustrate some of the challenges encountered and opportunities realized in terms of education and scientific advances. Network depiction of disciplinarity indicated that CTSA KRs and CTSA leadership contributed to discipline diversity especially in small (or nascent) MTTs. A separate depiction of MTT-KR utilization indicated that data analysis, translational technologies, and novel methods were heavily utilized by MTTs, whereas other KRs contributed significant effort to infrastructure development. We conclude that the CTSA can provide a rich, infrastructural framework and scientific environment for the development of successful MTTs.

KW - Multidisciplinary teams

KW - Team science

KW - Translational research

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84873724045&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84873724045&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/cts.12004

DO - 10.1111/cts.12004

M3 - Article

VL - 6

SP - 60

EP - 71

JO - Clinical and Translational Science

JF - Clinical and Translational Science

SN - 1752-8054

IS - 1

ER -